ATLANTA CHILD MURDERS! Is Wayne Williams The Murderer? Why Was He Never Indicted For The Murder Of Any Child? Even If He Did Murder Nathaniel Cater (Age 27) And Jimmy Ray Payne (Age 21), His Alleged Homosexual Lovers, That Does Not Prove Wayne Williams Murdered Even 1-Child! And If Wayne Williams Was “So Disgusted With His Own Race That He Hoped To Wipe Out Future Generations By Killing Black Children Before They Could Breed”, According To The District Attorney, Then Why Was Wayne Williams Involved In Romantic And Sexual Relationships With BLACK Men, Ages 21 And 27? You Can’t Have It Both Ways – But Atlanta Juries Did Not See That Contradiction Because The Prosecution’s Presentation Was So Prejudicial With ‘Atlanta Child Murderer’ Innuendo That Hearts Ruled Heads. Even Atlanta’s Black Mayor Wanted To Find A Black Murderer Because A White Murderer Would Have Meant RACE WAR! Not The Way Sherlock Holmes Would Investigate Serial Murders!

 

Originally published 2005 at Blog-City

 

ATLANTA CHILD MURDERS – Was Wayne Williams Railroaded? Why! Update

 

“The Atlanta Child Murders” airs tonight on the Biography Channel at 9pm and again at 1am EST.  I’ve seen the 2000 docudrama based on fact, “Who Killed Atlanta’s Children”, with Gregory Hines and James Belushi.  I do not have time, nor have I done the research to publish a complete article before tonight’s showing.  I can say that Wayne Williams was never indicted nor convicted of murdering any children, despite what the promo for this production implies.  He was convicted of killing two adult males in 1982, allegedly his male lovers, but not one child!  Why not?  The murderers were KKK whites, not Wayne Williams.  I’ll go on record with that opinion.  This article will be updated in the next few days.  I’ll be watching the telecast tonight along with the rest of you.

 

T.A.B.A.C.C.O.  (Truth About Business And Congressional Crimes Organization)  July 13, 2005

……………………………………………………………………………………

 


 

Wayne Williams

 

The curious and controversial string of deaths that sparked a two-year reign of terror in Atlanta, Georgia, has been labeled “child murders,” even though a suspect – ultimately blamed for the 23 of 30 “official” homicides – was finally convicted only in the deaths of two adult ex-convicts.  Today, about two decades after that suspect’s arrest, the case remains, in many minds, an unsolved mystery.

 

Investigation of the case began, officially, on July 28, 1979.  That afternoon, a woman hunting empty cans and bottles in Atlanta stumbled on a pair of corpses, carelessly concealed in roadside undergrowth.  One victim, shot with a .22-caliber weapon, was identified as 14-year-old Edward Smith, reported missing on July 21.  The other was 13-year-old Alfred Evans, last seen alive on July 25; the coroner ascribed his death to “probable” asphyxiation.  Both dead boys, like all of those to come, were African-American.

 

On September 4, Milton Harvey, age 14, vanished during a neighborhood bike ride.  His body was recovered three weeks later, but the cause of death remains officially “unknown.”  Yusef Bell, a nine-year-old, was last seen alive when his mother sent him to the store on October 21.  Found dead in an abandoned school November 8, he had been manually strangled by a powerful assailant.

 

Angel Lenair, age 12, was the first recognized victim of 1980.  Reported missing on March 4, she was found six days later, tied to a tree with her hands bound behind her.  The first female victim, she had been sexually abused and strangled; someone else’s panties were extracted from her throat.

 

On March 11, Jeffrey Mathis vanished on an errand to the store.  Eleven months would pass before recovery of his skeletal remains, advanced decomposition ruling out a declaration on the cause of death.  On May 18, 14-year-old Eric Middlebrooks left home after receiving a telephone call from persons unknown.  Found the next day, his death was blamed on head injuries, inflicted with a blunt instrument.

 

The terror escalated that summer.  On June 9, Christopher Richardson, 12, vanished en route to a neighborhood swimming pool.  Latonya Wilson was abducted from her home on June 22, the night before her seventh birthday, bringing Federal agents into the case.  The following day, 10-year-old Aaron Wyche was reported missing by his family.  Searchers found his body on June 24, lying beneath a railroad trestle, his neck broken.  Originally dubbed an accident, Aaron’s death was subsequently added to the growing list of dead and missing blacks.

 

Anthony Carter, age nine, disappeared while playing near his home on July 6, 1980; recovered the following day, he was dead from multiple stab wounds.  Earl Terrell joined the list on July 30, when he vanished from a public swimming pool.  Skeletal remains discovered on January 9, 1981, would yield no clues about the cause of death.

 

Next up on the list was 12-year-old Clifford Jones, snatched off the street and strangled on August 20.  With the recovery of his body in October, homicide detectives interviewed five witnesses who named his killer as a white man, later jailed in 1981 on charges of attempted rape and sodomy.  Those witnesses provided details of the crime consistent with the placement and condition of the victim’s body, but detectives chose to ignore their sworn statements, listing Jones with other victims of the “unknown” murderer.

 

Darren Glass, an 11-year-old, vanished near his home on September 14, 1980.  Never found, he joins the list primarily because authorities don’t know what else to do with his case.  October’s victim was Charles Stephens, reported missing on the 9th and recovered the next day, his life extinguished by asphyxiation.  Capping off the month, authorities discovered skeletal remains of Latonya Wilson on October 18, but they could not determine how she died.

 

On November 1, nine-year-old Aaron Jackson’s disappearance was reported to police by frantic parents.  The boy was found on November 2, another victim of asphyxiation.  Patrick Rogers, 15, followed on November 10.  His pitiful remains, skull crushed by heavy blows, were not unearthed until February 1981.

 

Two days after New Year’s, the elusive slayer picked off Lubie Geter, strangling the 14-year-old and dumping his body where it would not be found until February 5.  Terry Pue, 15, went missing on January 22 and was found the next day, strangled with a cord or piece of rope.  This time, detectives said that special chemicals enabled them to lift a suspect’s fingerprints from Terry’s corpse.  Unfortunately, they were not on file with any law enforcement agency in the United States.

 

Patrick Baltazar, age 12, disappeared on February 6.  His body was found a week later, marked by ligature strangulation, and the skeletal remains of Jeffrey Mathis were discovered nearby.  A 13-year-old, Curtis Walker, was strangled on February 19 and found the same day.  Joseph Bell, 16, was asphyxiated on March 2.  Timothy Hill, on March 11, was recorded as a drowning victim.

 

On March 30, Atlanta police added their first adult victim to the list of murdered children.  He was Larry Rogers, 20, linked with younger victims by the fact that he had been asphyxiated.  No cause of death was determined for a second adult victim, 21-year-old Eddie Duncan, but he made the list anyway, when his body was found on March 31.  On April 1, ex-convict Michael McIntosh, age 23, was added to the roster on grounds that he, too, had been asphyxiated.

 

By April 1981, it seemed apparent that the “child murders” case was getting out of hand.  Community critics denounced the official victims list as incomplete and arbitrary, citing cases like the January 1981 murder of Faye Yearby to prove their point.  Like “official” victim Angel Lenair, Yearby was bound to a tree by her killer, hands behind her back; she had been stabbed to death, like four acknowledged victims on the list.  Despite those similarities, police rejected Yearby’s case on grounds that (a) she was a female – as were Wilson and Lenair – and (b) that she was “too old” at age 22, although the last acknowledged victim had been 23.  Author Dave Dettlinger, examining police malfeasance in the case, suggests that 63 potential “pattern” victims were capriciously omitted from the “official” roster, 25 of them after a suspect’s arrest supposedly ended the killing.

 

In April 1981, FBI spokesmen declared that several of the crimes were “substantially solved,” outraging blacks with suggestions that some of the dead had been slain by their own parents.  While that storm was raging, Roy Innis, leader of the Congress of Racial Equality, went public with the story of a female witness who described the murders as the actions of a cult involved with drugs, pornography, and Satanism.  Innis led searchers to an apparent ritual site, complete with large inverted crosses, and his witness passed two polygraph examinations, but by that time police had focused their attention on another suspect, narrowing their scrutiny to the exclusion of all other possibilities.

 

On April 21, Jimmy Payne, a 21-year-old ex-convict, was reported missing in Atlanta.  Six days later, when his body was recovered, death was publicly attributed to suffocation, and his name was added to the list of murdered “children.”  William Barrett, 17, went missing May 11; he was found the next day, another victim of asphyxiation.

 

Several bodies had, by now, been pulled from local rivers, and police were staking out the waterways by night.  In the predawn hours of May 22, a rookie officer stationed under a bridge on the Chattahoochee River reported hearing “a splash” in the water nearby.  Above him, a car rumbled past, and officers manning the bridge were alerted.  Police and FBI agents halted a vehicle driven by Wayne Bertam Williams, a black man, and spent two hours grilling him and searching his car, before they let him go.  On May 24, the corpse of Nathaniel Cater, a 27-year-old convicted felon, was fished out of the river downstream.  Authorities put two and two together and focused their probe on Wayne Williams.

 

From the start, he made a most unlikely suspect.  The only child of two Atlanta schoolteachers, Williams still lived with his parents at age 23.  A college dropout, he cherished ambitions of earning fame and fortune as a music promoter.  In younger days, he had constructed a working radio station in the basement of the family home.

 

On June 21, Williams was arrested and charged with the murder of Nathaniel Cater, despite testimony from four witnesses who reported seeing Cater alive on May 22 and 23, after the infamous “splash.”  On July 17, Williams was indicted for killing two adults – Cater and Payne – while newspapers trumpeted the capture of Atlanta’s “child killer.”

 

At his trial, beginning in December 1981, the prosecution painted Williams as a violent homosexual and bigot, so disgusted with his own race that he hoped to wipe out future generations by killing black children before they could breed.  One witness testified that he saw Williams holding hands with Nathaniel Cater on May 21, a few hours before “the splash.”  Another, 15 years old, told the courts that Williams had paid him two dollars for the privilege of fondling his genitals.  Along the way, authorities announced the addition of a final victim, 28-year-old John Porter, to the list of victims.

 

Defense attorney tried to balance the scales with testimony from a woman who admitted having “normal sex” with Williams, but the prosecution won a crucial point when the presiding judge admitted testimony on 10 other deaths from the “child murders” list, designed to prove a pattern in the slayings.  One of those admitted was the case of Terry Pue, but neither side had anything to say about the fingerprints allegedly recovered from his corpse in January 1981.

 

The most impressive evidence of guilt was offered by a team of scientific experts, dealing with assorted hairs and fibers found on certain victims.  Testimony indicated that some fibers from a brand of carpet found inside the Williams home (and many other homes, as well) had been identified on several bodies.  Further, victims Middlebrooks, Wyche, Cater, Terrell, Jones, and Stephens all supposedly bore fibers from the trunk liner of 1979 Ford automobile owned by the Williams family.  The clothes of victim Stephens also allegedly yielded fibers from a second car – a 1970 Chevrolet – owned by Wayne’s parents.  Curiously, jurors were not informed of multiple eyewitness testimony naming a different suspect in the Jones case, nor were they advised of a critical gap in the prosecution’s fiber evidence.

 

Specifically, Wayne Williams had no access to the vehicles in question at the times when three of the six “fiber” victims were killed.  Wayne’s father took the Ford in for repairs at 9:00A.M. on July 30, 1980, nearly five hours before Earl Terrell vanished that afternoon.  Terrell was long dead before Williams got the car back on August 7, and it was retuned to the shop the next morning (August 8), still refusing to start.  A new estimate on repair costs was so expensive that Wayne’s father refused to pay, and the family never again had access to the car.  Meanwhile, Clifford Jones was kidnapped on August 20 and Charles Stephens on October 9, 1980.  He defendant’s family did not purchase the 1970 Chevrolet in question until October 21, 12 days after Stephen’s death.

 

On February 27, 1982, Wayne Williams was convicted on two counts of murder and sentenced to a double term of life imprisonment.  Two days later, the Atlanta “child murders” task force officially disbanded, announcing that 23 of 30 “list” cases were considered solved with his conviction, even though no charges had been filed.  The other seven cases, still open, reverted to the normal homicide detail and remain unsolved to this day.

 

In November 1985, a new team of lawyers uncovered once-classified documents from an investigation of the Ku Klux Klan, conducted during 1980 and 1981 by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.  A spy inside the Klan told GBI agents that Klansmen were “killing the children” in Atlanta, hoping to provoke a race war.  One Klansman in particular, Charles Sanders, allegedly boasted of murdering “List” victim Lubie Geter, following a personal altercation.  Geter reportedly struck Sanders’s car with a go-cart, prompting the Klansman to tell his friend, “I’m gonna kill him.  I’m gonna choke the black bastard to death.”  (Geter was, in fact, strangled, some three months after the incident in question.)  In early 1981, the same informant told GBI agents that “after twenty black-child killings, they, the Klan, were going to start killing black women.”  Perhaps coincidentally, police records note the unsolved murders of numerous black women in Atlanta in 1980-82, with most of the victims strangled.  On July 10, 1998, Butts County Superior Court Judge Hal Craig rejected the latest appeal for a new trial in Williams’ case, based on suppression of critical evidence 15 years earlier.

http://www.carpenoctem.tv/killers/williams.html.

 

 

 

ADDENDUM 6-15-10

Tabacco must conclude that the Wayne Williams Prosecution was one of the shrewdest Manipulations of Justice I have ever witnessed. By tying Williams to the murdered children during the trial and pre-trial, the Prosecution prejudiced the Jury to convict him of murdering two adults, Cater and Payne, even without undeniable evidence. Then, getting a conviction for those two murders, they were able to persuade the Public that, not only had they proven Williams was a murderer, but that he must also be guilty of murdering all those children, again without any proof, indictment or trial. That’s one clever bit of Sophistry, my friends.

 

In addition, during the trial the Prosecution produced witnesses, who swore they had seen Wayne Williams holding hands with one of the two adults he was accused of murdering. Although holding hands in public is damning, it is not proof of homosexuality. But let’s accept Wayne Williams’ homosexuality and see where that leads us! The Prosecution then made the assertion that Wayne Williams hated his own race so much that that was his motive for murdering all those Black children. This is where it gets interesting. How do you argue that Williams loves Black men and hates Black children? Hating Black men while loving Black children is possible. But doesn’t the Prosecution know that Black male children grow up to be Black men. Killing Black male children would defeat the purpose, wouldn’t it! Why didn’t the Prosecution produce witnesses to testify that Wayne was seen holding hands with White men? Then you might be able to make the argument that Wayne hated Blacks. But such was not the case. The Wayne Williams Prosecution is a very instructive instance of “killing 2 birds with one stone”.

 

These are marvelous examples of what is known as “CIRCULAR ARGUMENTS”. Use A to imply B, then use B to imply A. You don’t even have to concern yourself with Williams’ Guilt or Innocence. You merely have to realize that the Prosecution has not proven Williams’ Guilt re the two adults “beyond a reasonable doubt”. Any mathematician, who attempted to prove a theorem with such “Hocus Pocus”, would be drummed out of the mathematicians’ union!

 

If a single individual murdered all those people, including the adults, it would tend to dispute the homosexual angle because a homosexual might murder males or he might murder females, but unless he were “Son of Sam” murdering couples, it doesn’t make any sense that Williams or any homosexual would selectively murder both sexes. As to the theory that Williams hated Blacks, I have successfully shot holes all through that fantasy. However, nobody, including yours truly, contends that the murderer or murderers did not have a grudge against Blacks. That brings us back to the KKK or those of like mind, doesn’t it! It certainly does not imply Wayne Williams of the hand holding with Black adults in public!

 

The hardest part of this Scam was finding a Black Patsy, who could be fitted with the cloak of “child murderer”. Once they found Wayne Williams, they surmised he had murdered the two adults, Cater and Payne, but had insufficient proof. But Wayne’s association with children doomed him. When you talk about sexual or genocidal acts regarding children, proof is generally not necessary. Public anger will suffice! I doubt there was another Black male in Atlanta, who could have fitted the Prosecution’s needs as well as Wayne Williams did. But still, no proof! 

 

Fortunately, for the Prosecution, Tabacco was not on that jury. The problem with juries is that they most often use their emotions instead of their brains. The Prosecution did not have to convince 12 lawyers; it had only to convince 12 ordinary citizens. Prejudice is a two-headed monster that can be turned both north and south to achieve a goal. I must applaud the Prosecution on a clever ruse that has worked for 30 years. Even CNN in 2010 has failed to see through their artifices. “Atlanta Child Murders” MY FOOT!

 

In addition and contrasting to the peculiar addition of Adults included therein, this ‘Atlanta Child Murders’ List is far from complete. Isn’t it strange that the Media declined to profile Additional Murders of Atlanta’s Children after Wayne Williams was in police custody. This falls under the category of ‘Not Making The Case Against Your Own Case’ (Exculpatory), which Lawyers and DAs adhere to without fail.

 

Tabacco

Just the other day (2014) a 74-year-old Black woman, Mary Virginia Jones, was released from prison after serving 32 years for a murder she did not commit.


http://www.blacknews.com/news/woman-mary-virginia-jones-released-prison-after-32-years-murder-law-students101.html

 

Even White folks have been freed recently after serving prison time for crimes they never committed.

 

The Fact that Wayne Williams has served almost 32-years in prison for the murders of two adult, Black males does NOT imply that Wayne Williams is the Atlanta Child Murderer. A proves B, therefore B proves A again?

 

What about O J! He was free when those crimes were committed. Incidentally, O J probably murdered Jean Benet also.

 

Since we are assigning guilt to Black males for other crimes than ones for which they were charged, we might as well go all the way. Had Susan Smith given the Police Wayne Williams name, she might still be running around fancy-free!

 

Susan Leigh Vaughan Smith (born September 26, 1971) is an American criminal who was sentenced to life in prison for murdering her children. Born in Union, South Carolina, and a former student of the University of South Carolina Union, she was convicted on July 22, 1995 for murdering her two sons, 3-year-old Michael Daniel Smith, born October 10, 1991, and 14-month-old Alexander Tyler Smith, born August 5, 1993.[2] The case gained worldwide attention shortly after it developed, due to her claim that a black man carjacked her and kidnapped her sons. Her defense attorneys presented expert testimony that she suffered from mental health issues that impaired her judgment when she committed the crimes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Smith

Tabacco: Apparently her ‘impaired judgment’ recovered in time for Susan to blame her crime on a ‘black man’. As someone said, “Black men don’t want to take care of their own children, why would they want Susan Smith’s!”

 

The Deal is this: Had the Atlanta DA attempted to convict Wayne Williams as ‘The Atlanta Child Murderer’ and failed to get convictions, nobody could ‘claim’ Wayne was the culprit, and the Police would have had to continue their searches. This way, they can continue to ASSERT Wayne Williams is the ‘Atlanta Child Murderer’, point to him doing time for the murders of 2 adult males, and the Disinformed Public will buy into it ad nauseam because GROUP THINK is a powerful thing, even when devoid of Proof. Just look at modern day Religions for proof of this axiom!


UPDATE July 14, 2005

I watched “The Atlanta Child Murders” on the Biography Channel.  Basically, it presented both sides and drew no final conclusion.  However, the evidence was entirely circumstantial, the jury convicted Wayne Williams of killing two adult males, not children, and then, not because of fiber evidence, but because Wayne Williams exposed his anger in court.  Let me recap the events.

 

The reign of terror in Atlanta, GA, labeled as “The Atlanta Child Murders” took place from 1979 to 1981.  Wayne Williams, 23 at the time, was convicted in February, 1982.  Williams was blamed for 23 of 30 official homicides although he was only tried for two: 27-year-old Nathaniel Cater and 21 year old Jimmy Ray Payne.

 

Investigation of the case began officially on July 28, 1979.  That afternoon, a woman, hunting empty cans and bottles in Atlanta, stumbled on a pair of corpses, carelessly concealed in roadside undergrowth.  One victim, shot with a .22-caliber weapon, was identified as 14-year-old Edward Smith, reported missing on July 21.  The other was 13-year-old Alfred Evans, last seen alive on July 25; the coroner ascribed his death to “probable” asphyxiation.  Both dead boys, like all of those to come, were African-American.

 

OFFICIAL MURDER VICTIMS LIST:

1- 14-year-old Edward Smith, reported missing on July 21; found July 28, 1979; shot with .22-caliber

 

2- 13-year-old Alfred Evans, last seen alive on July 25; found July 28, 1979; death ascribed to “probable” asphyxiation

 

3- September 4, Milton Harvey, age 14, vanished during a neighborhood bike ride.  His body was recovered three weeks later, but the cause of death remains officially “unknown”

 

4- Yusef Bell, nine, was last seen alive when his mother sent him to the store on October 21.  Found dead in an abandoned school November 8, he had been manually strangled by a powerful assailant

 

5- Angel Lenair, age 12, was the first recognized victim of 1980.  Reported missing on March 4, she was found six days later, tied to a tree with her hands bound behind her.  The first female victim, she had been sexually abused and strangled; someone else’s panties were extracted from her throat.

(How does the black homosexual theory fit this 12-year-old girl?  Not very well!)

 

6- On March 11, Jeffrey Mathis vanished on an errand to the store.  Eleven months would pass before recovery of his skeletal remains, advanced decomposition ruling out a declaration on the cause of death. 

 

7- On May 18, 14-year-old Eric Middlebrooks left home after receiving a phone call from persons unknown.  Found the next day, his death blamed on head injuries, inflicted with a blunt instrument

 

8- On June 9, Christopher Richardson, 12, vanished en route to a neighborhood swimming pool

 

9- Latonya Wilson was abducted from her home on June 22, the night before her seventh birthday, bringing Federal agents into the case 

 

10- The following day, 10-year-old Aaron Wyche was reported missing by his family.  Searchers found his body on June 24, lying beneath a railroad trestle, his neck broken.  Originally dubbed an accident, Aaron’s death was subsequently added to the growing list of dead and missing blacks

 

11- Anthony Carter, age 9, disappeared while playing near his home on July 6, 1980; recovered the following day, he was dead from multiple stab wounds. 

 

12- Earl Terrell joined the list on July 30, when he vanished from a public swimming pool.  Skeletal remains discovered on January 9, 1981, would yield no clues about the cause of death

 

13- 12-year-old Clifford Jones, snatched off the street and strangled on August 20.  With the recovery of his body in October, homicide detectives interviewed five witnesses who named his killer as a white man, later jailed in 1981 on charges of attempted rape and sodomy.  Those witnesses provided details of the crime consistent with the placement and condition of the victim’s body, but detectives chose to ignore their sworn statements, listing Jones with other victims of the “unknown” murderer

 

14- Darren Glass, 11-year-old, vanished near his home on September 14, 1980.  Never found, he joins the list primarily because authorities don’t know what else to do with his case 

 

15- October’s victim was Charles Stephens, reported missing on the 9th and recovered the next day, his life extinguished by asphyxiation 

 

9- Capping off the month, authorities discovered skeletal remains of Latonya Wilson on October 18, but they could not determine how she died

 

16- On November 1, nine-year-old Aaron Jackson’s disappearance was reported to police by frantic parents.  The boy was found on November 2, another victim of asphyxiation. 

 

17- Patrick Rogers, 15, followed on November 10.  His pitiful remains, skull crushed by heavy blows, were not unearthed until February 1981

 

18- Two days after New Year’s, the elusive slayer picked off Lubie Geter, strangling the 14-year-old and dumping his body where it would not be found until February 5 

 

19- Terry Pue, 15, went missing on January 22 and was found the next day, strangled with a cord or piece of rope.  This time, detectives said that special chemicals enabled them to lift a suspect’s fingerprints from Terry’s corpse.  Unfortunately, they were not on file with any law enforcement agency in the United States

(Obviously, they weren’t Wayne Williams’ prints.  Why didn’t they check Charles Sanders’ prints?)

 

20- Patrick Baltazar, age 12, disappeared on February 6.  His body was found a week later, marked by ligature strangulation, and the skeletal remains of Jeffrey Mathis (No 6) were discovered nearby 

 

21- 13-year-old Curtis Walker was strangled on February 19 and found the same day. 

 

22- Joseph Bell, 16, was asphyxiated on March 2 

 

23- Timothy Hill, on March 11, was recorded as a drowning victim

 

24- On March 30, Atlanta police added their first adult victim to the list of murdered children.  He was Larry Rogers, 20, linked with younger victims by the fact that he had been asphyxiated. 

 

25- No cause of death was determined for a second adult victim, 21-year-old Eddie Duncan, but he made the list anyway, when his body was found on March 31 

 

26- On April 1, ex-convict Michael McIntosh, age 23, was added to the roster on grounds that he, too, had been asphyxiated

(Nos 24, 25, 26 are all out-of-character.  Did they ever consider possibility of copycat murders?)

 

By April 1981, it seemed apparent that the “child murders” case was getting out of hand.  Community critics denounced the official victims list as incomplete and arbitrary, citing cases like the January 1981 murder of Faye Yearby to prove their point.  Like “official” victim Angel Lenair (No 5), Yearby was bound to a tree by her killer, hands behind her back; she had been stabbed to death, like four acknowledged victims on the list.  Despite those similarities, police rejected Yearby’s case on grounds that (a) she was a female – as were Wilson (No 9) and Lenair (No 5) – and (b) that she was “too old” at age 22, although the last acknowledged victim had been 23.  Author Dave Dettlinger, examining police malfeasance in the case, suggests that 63 potential “pattern” victims were capriciously omitted from the “official” roster, 25 of them after a suspect’s arrest supposedly ended the killing.

 

In April 1981, FBI spokesmen declared that several of the crimes were “substantially solved,” outraging blacks with suggestions that some of the dead had been slain by their own parents.  While that storm was raging, Roy Innis, leader of the Congress of Racial Equality, went public with the story of a female witness who described the murders as the actions of a cult involved with drugs, pornography, and Satanism.  Innis led searchers to an apparent ritual site, complete with large inverted crosses, and his witness passed two polygraph examinations, but by that time police had focused their attention on another suspect, narrowing their scrutiny to the exclusion of all other possibilities.

 

27- On April 21, Jimmy Payne, a 21-year-old ex-convict, was reported missing in Atlanta.  Six days later, when his body was recovered, death was publicly attributed to suffocation, and his name was added to the list of murdered “children” 

 

28- William Barrett, 17, went missing May 11; he was found the next day, asphyxiation victim

 

Several bodies had, by now, been pulled from local rivers, and police were staking out the waterways by night.  In the predawn hours of May 22, a rookie officer stationed under a bridge on the Chattahoochee River reported hearing “a splash” in the water nearby.  Above him, a car rumbled past, and officers manning the bridge were alerted.  Police and FBI agents halted a vehicle driven by Wayne Bertram Williams, a black man, and spent two hours grilling him and searching his car, before they let him go. 

 

29- On May 24, the corpse of Nathaniel Cater, a 27-year-old convicted felon, was fished out of the river downstream.  Authorities put two and two together and focused their probe on Wayne Williams

 

From the start, he made a most unlikely suspect.  The only child of two Atlanta schoolteachers, Williams still lived with his parents at age 23.  A college dropout, he cherished ambitions of earning fame and fortune as a music promoter.  In younger days, he had constructed a working radio station in the basement of the family home.

 

On June 21, Williams was arrested and charged with the murder of Nathaniel Cater (No 29), despite testimony from four witnesses who reported seeing Cater alive on May 22 and 23, after the infamous “splash.”  On July 17, Williams was indicted for killing two adults – Cater and Payne (No 27) – while newspapers trumpeted the capture of Atlanta’s “child killer”.

 

At his trial, beginning in December 1981, the prosecution painted Williams as a violent homosexual and bigot, so disgusted with his own race that he hoped to wipe out future generations by killing black children before they could breed.  One witness testified that he saw Williams holding hands with Nathaniel Cater (No 29) on May 21, a few hours before “the splash.”  Another, 15 years old, told the courts that Williams had paid him two dollars for the privilege of fondling his genitals. 

 

30- Along the way, authorities announced the addition of a final victim, 28-year-old John Porter, to the list of victims

(Give me a break!  Why no 56 year olds?  Remember, Wayne Williams is now 23.)

 

The defense attorney tried to balance the scales with testimony from a woman who admitted having “normal sex” with Williams, but the prosecution won a crucial point when the presiding judge admitted testimony on 10 other deaths from the “child murders” list, designed to prove a pattern in the slayings.  One of those admitted was the case of Terry Pue (No 19), but neither side had anything to say about the fingerprints allegedly recovered from his corpse in January 1981.

 

The most impressive evidence of guilt was offered by a team of scientific experts, dealing with assorted hairs and fibers found on certain victims.  Testimony indicated that some fibers from a brand of carpet found inside the Williams’ home (and many other homes, as well) had been identified on several bodies.  Further, victims Middlebrooks (No 7), Wyche (No 10), Cater (No 29), Terrell (No 12), Jones (No 13), and Stephens (No 15) all supposedly bore fibers from the trunk liner of 1979 Ford automobile owned by the Williams family.  The clothes of victim Stephens (No 15) also allegedly yielded fibers from a second car – a 1970 Chevrolet – owned by Wayne’s parents.  Curiously, jurors were not informed of multiple eyewitness testimony naming a different suspect in the Jones (No 13) case, nor were they advised of a critical gap in the prosecution’s fiber evidence.

 

Specifically, Wayne Williams had no access to the vehicles in question at the times when three of the six “fiber” victims were killed.  Wayne’s father took the Ford in for repairs at 9:00A.M. on July 30, 1980, nearly five hours before Earl Terrell (No 12) vanished that afternoon.  Terrell was long dead before Williams got the car back on August 7, and it was retuned to the shop the next morning (August 8), still refusing to start.  A new estimate on repair costs was so expensive that Wayne’s father refused to pay, and the family never again had access to the car.  Meanwhile, Clifford Jones (No 13) was kidnapped on August 20 and Charles Stephens (No 15) on October 9, 1980.  The defendant’s family did not purchase the 1970 Chevrolet in question until October 21, 12 days after Stephen’s death.

 

On February 27, 1982, Wayne Williams was convicted on two counts of murder and sentenced to consecutive life imprisonment terms.  Two days later, the Atlanta “child murders” task force officially disbanded, announcing that 23 of 30 “list” cases were considered solved with his conviction, even though no charges had been filed.  The other seven cases, still open, reverted to the normal homicide detail and remain unsolved to this day.

 

In November 1985, a new team of lawyers uncovered once-classified documents from an investigation of the Ku Klux Klan, conducted during 1980 and 1981 by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.  A spy inside the Klan told GBI agents that Klansmen were “killing the children” in Atlanta, hoping to provoke a race war.  One Klansman in particular, Charles Sanders, allegedly boasted of murdering “List” victim Lubie Geter (No 18), following a personal altercation.  Geter reportedly struck Sanders’ car with a go-cart, prompting the Klansman to tell his friend, “I’m gonna kill him.  I’m gonna choke the black bastard to death.”  (Geter was, in fact, strangled, some three months after the incident in question.)  In early 1981, the same informant told GBI agents that “after twenty black-child killings, they, the Klan, were going to start killing black women.”  Perhaps coincidentally, police records note the unsolved murders of numerous black women in Atlanta in 1980-82, with most of the victims strangled.  On July 10, 1998, Butts County Superior Court Judge Hal Craig rejected the latest appeal for a new trial in Williams’s case, based on suppression of critical evidence 15 years earlier.

http://www.carpenoctem.tv/killers/williams.html

 

 

Q & A

1- If Wayne Williams murdered all those children, why was he never charged with any of those crimes?  Authorities claimed Williams was not tried because of the cost to taxpayers.  That’s Bullcrap.  They didn’t have convincing cases – that’s why he was never tried.

 

2- How could Wayne Williams, aka Superman, leave evidence in a car that he was not in possession of until after the crime was committed?

 

3- Why didn’t the police follow up on the five Clifford Jones (No 13) eyewitnesses, who, in sworn statements, called his killer a white man, who was later jailed in 1981 on charges of attempted rape and sodomy?

 

4- Why was nothing done about the 1991 court testimony by Billy Joe Whitaker, FBI informant, that Charles Sanders, a white KKK member, confessed that he had killed Lubie Geter (No 18)?  Whitaker also quoted Sanders as saying the Klan would begin killing black women after 20 black children were killed.  “Perhaps coincidentally, police records note the unsolved murders of numerous black women in Atlanta in 1980-82, with most of the victims strangled.

 

5- If Wayne Williams is a homosexual and a killer, a) why would he also kill women and girls, and b) why would he kill adult males?  This theory is full of holes.

 

6- Why weren’t the fingerprints, lifted from Pue’s (No 19) dead body, compared with Wayne Williams, Charles Sanders & the white man, jailed in 1981 on charges of attempted rape and sodomy?

 

7- Were the adult men added to the case file so that Wayne Williams could be tried in the court of public opinion for the children also, without actually trying him in criminal court?

 

8- Why was Faye Yearby kept off the official list because a) she was female – so were Wilson (No 9) and Lenair (No 5) – and b) that she was too old at age 22 – Nathaniel Cater (No 29) was 27 years old?

 

9- Why in April 1981 didn’t the FBI follow up with Roy Innis’ witness to the Satanic cult (who passed two polygraph exams)?  Because they were after Wayne Williams by then – their suspect of choice!

 

10- Why were different methods of murder all attributed to one individual, rather than to multiple suspects? Perhaps because the authorities had a perfect patsy, who in addition to other made-to-order qualities, was more importantly black, not white.

 

11- Did anyone notice that both Cater (No 29) and Payne (No 27), whom Wayne Williams was tried and convicted for killing, were both ex-convicts?  I fail to see the connection between those two and any of the other 28 on the official list (mostly under 16 years of age)!

 

12- Are fibers unique?  Can fibers be planted?  The O J Simpson trial proved that evidence can be manipulated, even by policemen.  O J would be, not only a killer, but the dumbest ex-jock on the face of the earth, if all the blood evidence found were left by him.  Then, there was that matter of the pint of his blood in police custody!  If it had been a white man on trial for allegedly killing his black wife, would a white jury have acquitted that white man once it became clear that black officers had tampered with the evidence?  All you need, to acquit, is reasonable doubt.

 

13- The Wayne Williams jury were questioned after the guilty verdict.  They said the fiber evidence had no effect upon their decision.  What did have an effect was Wayne Williams’ testimony. (Williams’ defense attorney did not want him to testify; he insisted on taking the stand). After two days on the stand, Williams showed his temper – the jury didn’t like him.  Is that a good enough reason to sentence a man to two consecutive life terms in prison – because the jury didn’t like him?  Not all innocent people are likeable; and not all guilty people are monsters. 

 

Only in Western movies did the good guys wear only white hats; and the bad guys wore only black.  Later on in Hollywood, Hopalong Cassidy wore a black outfit with his white hat.

 

Lash Larue and Charles Starrett as “The Durango Kid” (good guys) wore not only black outfits but black hats too.  If Hollywood could learn, maybe the American public can learn also.

         

 

The alleged motive for the Klan killing black children is the same motive that Charles Manson confessed to – namely, to start a race war.  That conspiracy motive is more feasible than a lone black man, Wayne Williams, attempting to wipe out poor black youth in Atlanta because he was ashamed of them.

 

In conclusion, there is no way I could find Wayne Williams guilty of murdering anyone based upon the circumstantial evidence, the desperation demonstrated by white and black officials in Atlanta to NOT find a white suspect, the suppression of evidence which was exculpatory, the holes in the prosecution’s theory, the incompatibility of evidence with facts.

 

I have no way of knowing whether Wayne Williams actually killed 27-year-old Nathaniel Cater and 21 year old Jimmy Ray Payne.  But the evidence is certainly not conclusive.  As to whether or not he killed any of the children, even the Atlanta prosecution team knew they couldn’t win that one.  The travesty is that the real killers were allowed to escape punishment.  Wayne Williams is still incarcerated.

 

It is a complete falsehood that murder ceased in Atlanta once Wayne Williams was incarcerated.  Murder has never ceased in Atlanta.

 

One final note: juries usually do not know for a fact whether the defendant is “guilty” or not.  Was Klaus von Bulow guilty?  The jury’s function is to determine whether the prosecution has made the case so that there is no reasonable doubt.  The defense does not have to prove anything!  They only have to show up.  Americans are concerned with guilt or innocence.  Judges and juries are concerned with reasonable doubt.  When Solomon offered to split the disputed baby in half and give each woman, who claimed him, half; he had no 100% sure way of knowing that only one of the two women would offer to give up the baby.  He took a calculated risk.  What if both women had offered to give the baby up?  That’s the kind of enigma that judges and juries face.

 

Definitions (World Book Dictionary):

EXCULPATORY, adjective

that clears or tends to clear from blame; exculpating.

 

         

  

Tabacco: I consider myself both a funnel and a filter. I funnel information, not readily available on the Mass Media, which is ignored and/or suppressed. I filter out the irrelevancies and trivialities to save both the time and effort of my Readers and bring consternation to the enemies of Truth & Fairness! When you read Tabacco, if you don’t learn something NEW, I’ve wasted your time.

 

Tabacco is not a blogger, who thinks; I am a Thinker, who blogs. Speaking Truth to Power!

 

In 1981′s ‘Body Heat’, Kathleen Turner said, “Knowledge is power”.


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B-C0049/B-C0050 published at Blog-City 2005

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