IATROGENESIS! The Truth That Dare Not Speak Its Name! Iatrogenic Deaths: America’s Dark Secret – The Leading Cause of Death In USA, Not Auto, Heart Or Cancer, But The AMA Won’t Permit It To Be Mentioned On Autopsies! – RI10

Iatrogenic Deaths: America’s Dark Secret – Leading Cause of Death In USA, Not Auto, Heart Or Cancer – RI10

Iatrogenic Deaths: America’s Dark Secret – Leading Cause of Death In USA, Not Auto, Heart Or Cancer – RI10

 

 

Tabacco Notes to myself when preparing this Post in 2007

Source: Dr. Donald Berwick, Healthcare Improvement Inst. on CNN “Paula Zahn Now” 6/17/05…

if 44,000: > breast cancer or auto accidents or AIDS; 8th most serious public health problem in US;

if 98,000: makes it 4th most common cause of death in US;

RESEARCH!

Iatrogenic Deaths!!!:

Defined- iatrogenic, adj.

(of a symptom or disease) induced by a physician, as in physical conditions caused by worry over a physician’s diagnosis.

 

http://www.tssgh.com/i/iatrogenic_deaths.html

 

 


Tabacco: Are you afraid of doctors and hospitals? No? Well, maybe you should be. Those of us, who are afraid or will admit to that fear, may not be so irrational after all. Read on!


Iatrogenesis
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Ancient Greek painting in a vase,

showing a physician (iatros)

bleeding a patient.

Tabacco: Maybe modern-day Medicine hasn’t advanced as far as we think it has. Bring on the leeches!

Iatrogenesis literally means “brought forth by a healer” (iatros means healer in Greek); as such, it can refer to good or bad effects, but it is almost exclusively used to refer to a state of ill health or adverse effect or complication caused by or resulting from misguided medical treatment. From a sociological point of view there are three types of Iatrogenesis: clinical Iatrogenesis, social Iatrogenesis, and cultural Iatrogenesis. While Iatrogenesis is most often used to refer to the harmful consequences of actions by physicians, it can equally be the result of actions by other medical professionals, such as psychologists, therapists, pharmacists, nurses, dentists. etc. Further, iatrogenic illness or death is not restricted to Western medicine: alternative medicine (sometimes referred to as complementary medicine) may be considered an equal source of Iatrogenesis for the same reasons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iatrogenesis

 

i·at·ro·gen·ic (-tr-jnk)
adj.
Induced in a patient by a physician’s activity, manner, or therapy.

The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary, 2nd Edition Copyright © 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/iatrogenic

: induced inadvertently by a physician or surgeon or by medical treatment or diagnostic procedures  *an iatrogenic rash*
Merriam-Webster’s 11th Collegiate Dictionary

Iatrogenic

Iatrogenic is defined as disease caused by medical examination or treatment.  This includes disease, illness, or death from Drug Reactions, Vaccines, irresponsibly prescribed drugs such as Ritalin, et al, turning a blind eye to the dangers of such approved (and deadly) chemicals as Aspartame, ignoring many societal caused maladies (everything from EMF Dangers to Computer Game Problems), disregarding negative effects of Mental Health on individual’s general welfare, and mistakes, errors, omissions, and blunders by hospitals, medical doctors, nurses, and other individuals in the mainstream medical establishment.

http://www.halexandria.org/dward048.htm

 

The American Medical System
Is The Leading Cause Of Death And Injury In The
United States
By Gary Null PhD, Carolyn Dean MD ND, Martin Feldman MD, Debora Rasio MD, Dorothy Smith PhD


A definitive review and close reading of medical peer-review journals, and government health statistics shows that American medicine frequently causes more harm than good. The number of people having in-hospital, adverse drug reactions (ADR) to prescribed medicine is 2.2 million. (1) Dr. Richard Besser, of the CDC, in 1995, said the number of unnecessary antibiotics prescribed annually for viral infections was 20 million. Dr. Besser, in 2003, now refers to tens of millions of unnecessary antibiotics. (2, 2a)

The number of unnecessary medical and surgical procedures performed annually is 7.5 million. (3) The number of people exposed to unnecessary hospitalization annually is 8.9 million. (4) The total number of iatrogenic [induced inadvertently by a physician or surgeon or by medical treatment or diagnostic procedures] deaths is 783,936.

The 2001 heart disease annual death rate is 699,697; the annual cancer death rate is 553,251. (5)

It is evident that the American medical system is the leading cause of death and injury in the United States.


Introduction
Never before have the complete statistics on the multiple causes of Iatrogenesis been combined in one paper. Medical science amasses tens of thousands of papers annually—each one a tiny fragment of the whole picture. To look at only one piece and try to understand the benefits and risks is to stand one inch away from an elephant and describe everything about it. You have to pull back to reveal the complete picture, such as we have done here. Each specialty, each division of medicine, keeps their own records and data on morbidity and mortality like pieces of a puzzle. But the numbers and statistics were always hiding in plain sight. We have now completed the painstaking work of reviewing thousands and thousands of studies. Finally putting the puzzle together we came up with some disturbing answers.

Is American Medicine Working?
At 14 percent of the Gross National Product, health care spending reached $1.6 trillion in 2003. (15) Considering this enormous expenditure, we should have the best medicine in the world. We should be reversing disease, preventing disease, and doing minimal harm. However, careful and objective review shows the opposite. Because of the extraordinary narrow context of medical technology through which contemporary medicine examines the human condition, we are completely missing the full picture.

Medicine is not taking into consideration the following monumentally important aspects of a healthy human organism:

(a) Stress and how it adversely affects the immune system and life processes
(b) Insufficient exercise
(c) Excessive caloric intake
(d) Highly processed and denatured foods grown in denatured and chemically damaged soil
(e) Exposure to tens of thousands of environmental toxins.


Instead of minimizing these disease-causing factors, we actually cause more illness through medical technology, diagnostic testing, overuse of medical and surgical procedures, and overuse of pharmaceutical drugs. The huge disservice of this therapeutic strategy is the result of little effort or money being appropriated for preventing disease.

Under-reporting of Iatrogenic Events
As few as 5 percent and only up to 20 percent of iatrogenic acts are ever reported. (16, 24, 25, 33,34) This implies that if medical errors were completely and accurately reported, we would have a much higher annual iatrogenic death rate than 783,936. Dr. Leape, in 1994, said his figure of 180,000 medical mistakes annually was equivalent to three jumbo-jet crashes every two days.16 Our report shows that six jumbo jets are falling out of the sky each and every day.

Correcting a Compromised System

What we must deduce from this report is that medicine is in need of complete and total reform: from the curriculum in medical schools to protecting patients from excessive medical intervention. It is quite obvious that we can’t change anything if we are not honest about what needs to be changed. This report simply shows the degree to which change is required.

We are fully aware that what stands in the way of change are powerful pharmaceutical companies, medical technology companies, and special interest groups with enormous vested interests in the business of medicine. They fund medical research, support medical schools and hospitals, and advertise in medical journals. With deep pockets they entice scientists and academics to support their efforts. Such funding can sway the balance of opinion from professional caution to uncritical acceptance of a new therapy or drug.

You only have to look at the number of invested people on hospital, medical, and government health advisory boards to see conflict of interest. The public is mostly unaware of these interlocking interests. For example, a 2003 study found that nearly half of medical school faculty, who serve on Institutional Review Boards (IRB) to advise on clinical trial research, also serve as consultants to the pharmaceutical industry. (17) The authors were concerned that such representation could cause potential conflicts of interest.

A news release by Dr. Erik Campbell, the lead author, said, “Our previous research with faculty has shown us that ties to industry can affect scientific behavior, leading to such things as trade secrecy and delays in publishing research. It’s possible that similar relationships with companies could affect IRB members’ activities and attitudes.” (18)

Medical Ethics and Conflict of Interest in Scientific Medicine
Jonathan Quick, director of Essential Drugs and Medicines Policy for the World Health Organization (WHO) wrote in a recent WHO Bulletin:

 

“If clinical trials become a
commercial venture in which
self-interest overrules
public interest
& desire overrules science, then
the social contract which allows
research on human subjects in
return for medical advances is
broken.” (19)

 

 

Former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Dr. Marcia Angell, struggled to bring the attention of the world to the problem of commercializing scientific research in her outgoing editorial titled “Is Academic Medicine for Sale?” (20) Angell called for stronger restrictions on pharmaceutical stock ownership and other financial incentives for researchers. She said that growing conflicts of interest are tainting science.

She warned that, “When the boundaries between industry and academic medicine become as blurred as they are now, the business goals of industry influence the mission of medical schools in multiple ways.” She did not discount the benefits of research but said a Faustian bargain now existed between medical schools and the pharmaceutical industry.

Angell left the NEMJ in June 2000. Two years later, in June 2002, the NEJM announced that it would now accept biased journalists (those who accept money from drug companies) because it is too difficult to find ones who have no ties. Another former editor of the journal, Dr. Jerome Kassirer, said that was just not the case, that there are plenty of researchers who don’t work for drug companies. (21) The ABC report said that one measurable tie, between pharmaceutical companies and doctors, amounts to over $2 billion a year spent for over 314,000 events that doctors attend.

The ABC report also noted that a survey of clinical trials revealed that when a drug company funds a study, there is a 90 percent chance that the drug will be perceived as effective whereas a non-drug company-funded study will show favorable results 50 percent of the time.

It appears that money can’t buy you love but it can buy you any “scientific” result you want.

The only safeguard to reporting these studies was if the journal writers remained unbiased. That is no longer the case.

Cynthia Crossen, writer for the Wall Street Journal in 1996, published “Tainted Truth: The Manipulation of Fact in America,” a book about the widespread practice of lying with statistics. (22) Commenting on the state of scientific research she said that:

“The road to hell was paved with the flood of corporate research dollars that eagerly filled gaps left by slashed government research funding.”

Her data on financial involvement showed that in l981 the drug industry “gave” $292 million to colleges and universities for research. In l991 it “gave” $2.1 billion.

The First Iatrogenic Study
Dr. Lucian L. Leape opened medicine’s Pandora’s box in his 1994 JAMA paper, “Error in Medicine.” (16) He began the paper by reminiscing about Florence Nightingale’s maxim—”first do no harm.” But he found evidence of the opposite happening in medicine. He found that Schimmel reported in 1964 that 20 percent of hospital patients suffered iatrogenic injury, with a 20 percent fatality rate. Steel in 1981 reported that 36 percent of hospitalized patients experienced Iatrogenesis with a 25 percent fatality rate and adverse drug reactions were involved in 50 percent of the injuries. Bedell in 1991 reported that 64 percent of acute heart attacks in one hospital were preventable and were mostly due to adverse drug reactions.

However, Leape focused on his and Brennan’s “Harvard Medical Practice Study” published in 1991.16a They found that in 1984, in New York State, there was a 4 percent iatrogenic injury rate for patients with a 14 percent fatality rate. From the 98,609 patients injured and the 14 percent fatality rate, he estimated that in the whole of the United States 180,000 people die each year, partly as a result of iatrogenic injury. Leape compared these deaths to the equivalent of three jumbo-jet crashes every two days.

Why Leape chose to use the much lower figure of four percent injury for his analysis remains in question. Perhaps he wanted to tread lightly. If Leape had, instead, calculated the average rate among the three studies he cites (36 percent, 20 percent, and 4 percent), he would have come up with a 20 percent medical error rate. The number of fatalities that he could have presented, using an average rate of injury and his 14 percent fatality, is an annual 1,189,576 iatrogenic deaths, or over ten jumbo jets crashing every day.

Leape acknowledged that the literature on medical error is sparse and we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg. He said that when errors are specifically sought out, reported rates are “distressingly high.” He cited several autopsy studies with rates as high as 35 percent to 40 percent of missed diagnoses causing death. He also commented that an intensive care unit reported an average of 1.7 errors per day per patient, and 29 percent of those errors were potentially serious or fatal.

We wonder: what is the effect on someone who daily gets the wrong medication, the wrong dose, the wrong procedure; how do we measure the accumulated burden of injury; and when the patient finally succumbs after the tenth error that week, what is entered on the death certificate?

Leape calculated the rate of error in the intensive care unit. First, he found that each patient had an average of 178 “activities” (staff/procedure/medical interactions) a day, of which 1.7 were errors, which means a 1 percent failure rate. To some this may not seem like much, but putting this into perspective, Leape cited industry standards where in aviation a 0.1 percent failure rate would mean:

* Two unsafe plane landings per day at O’Hare airport
* In the U.S. mail, 16,000 pieces of lost mail every hour
* In banking, 32,000 bank checks deducted from the wrong bank account every hour

Analyzing why there is so much medical error Leape acknowledged the lack of reporting. Unlike a jumbo-jet crash, which gets instant media coverage, hospital errors are spread out over the country in thousands of different locations. They are also perceived as isolated and unusual events. However, the most important reason that medical error is unrecognized and growing, according to Leape, was, and still is, that doctors and nurses are unequipped to deal with human error, due to the culture of medical training and practice.

Doctors are taught that mistakes are unacceptable. Medical mistakes are therefore viewed as a failure of character and any error equals negligence. We can see how a great deal of sweeping under the rug takes place since nobody is taught what to do when medical error does occur. Leape cited McIntyre and Popper who said the “infallibility model” of medicine leads to intellectual dishonesty with a need to cover up mistakes rather than admit them. There are no Grand Rounds on medical errors, no sharing of failures among doctors and no one to support them emotionally when their error harms a patient. Leape hoped his paper would encourage medicine “to fundamentally change the way they think about errors and why they occur.” It’s been almost a decade since this groundbreaking work, but the mistakes continue to soar.

One year later, in 1995, a report in JAMA said that:

“Over a million patients are injured in U.S. hospitals each year, and approximately 280,000 die annually as a result of these injuries. Therefore, the iatrogenic death rate dwarfs the annual automobile accident mortality rate of 45,000 and accounts for more deaths than all other accidents combined.” (23)

At a press conference in 1997 Dr. Leape released a nationwide poll on patient Iatrogenesis conducted by the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF), which is sponsored by the American Medical Association. The survey found that more than 100 million Americans have been impacted directly and indirectly by a medical mistake. Forty-two percent were directly affected and a total of 84 percent personally knew of someone who had experienced a medical mistake. (14) Dr. Leape is a founding member of the NPSF.

Dr. Leape at this press conference also updated his 1994 statistics saying that medical errors in inpatient hospital settings nationwide, as of 1997, could be as high as 3 million and could cost as much as $200 billion. Leape used a 14 percent fatality rate to determine a medical error death rate of 180,000 in 1994. (16) In 1997, using Leape’s base number of 3 million errors, the annual deaths could be as much as 420,000 for inpatients alone. This does not include nursing home deaths, or people in the outpatient community dying of drug side effects or as the result of medical procedures.

Only a Fraction of Medical Errors are Reported
Leape, in 1994, said that he was well aware that medical errors were not being reported. (16) According to a study in two obstetrical units in the U.K., only about one quarter of the adverse incidents on the units are ever reported for reasons of protecting staff or preserving reputations, or fear of reprisals, including law suits. (24) An analysis by Wald and Shojania found that only 1.5 percent of all adverse events result in an incident report, and only 6 percent of adverse drug events are identified properly.

The authors learned that the American College of Surgeons gives a very broad guess that surgical incident reports routinely capture only 5 percent to 30 percent of adverse events. In one surgical study only 20 percent of surgical complications resulted in discussion at Morbidity and Mortality Rounds.25 From these studies it appears that all the statistics that are gathered may be substantially underestimating the number of adverse drug and medical therapy incidents. It also underscores the fact that our mortality statistics are actually conservative figures.

An article in Psychiatric Times outlines the stakes involved with reporting medical errors. (26) They found that the public is fearful of suffering a fatal medical error, and doctors are afraid they will be sued if they report an error. This brings up the obvious question: who is reporting medical errors? Usually it is the patient or the patient’s surviving family. If no one notices the error, it is never reported. Janet Heinrich, an associate director at the U.S. General Accounting Office responsible for health financing and public health issues, testifying before a House subcommittee about medical errors, said that: “The full magnitude of their threat to the American public is unknown.” She added, “Gathering valid and useful information about adverse events is extremely difficult.”

She acknowledged that the fear of being blamed, and the potential for legal liability, played key roles in the under-reporting of errors. The Psychiatric Times noted that the American Medical Association is strongly opposed to mandatory reporting of medical errors.26 If doctors aren’t reporting, what about nurses? In a survey of nurses, they also did not report medical mistakes for fear of retaliation. (27)

Standard medical pharmacology texts admit that relatively few doctors ever report adverse drug reactions to the FDA. (28) The reasons range from not knowing such a reporting system exists to fear of being sued because they prescribed a drug that caused harm. (29)However, it is this tremendously flawed system of voluntary reporting from doctors that we depend on to know whether a drug or a medical intervention is harmful.

Pharmacology texts will also tell doctors how hard it is to separate drug side effects from disease symptoms. Treatment failure is most often attributed to the disease and not the drug or the doctor. Doctors are warned, “Probably nowhere else in professional life are mistakes so easily hidden, even from ourselves.” (30) It may be hard to accept, but not difficult to understand, why only one in twenty side effects is reported to either hospital administrators or the FDA. (31,31a)

If hospitals admitted to the actual number of errors and mistakes, which is about 20 times what is reported, they would come under intense scrutiny. (32) Jerry Phillips, associate director of the Office of Post Marketing Drug Risk Assessment at the FDA, confirms this number. “In the broader area of adverse drug reaction data, the 250,000 reports received annually probably represent only 5 percent of the actual reactions that occur.” (33) Dr. Jay Cohen, who has extensively researched adverse drug reactions, comments that because only 5 percent of adverse drug reactions are being reported, there are, in reality, 5 million medication reactions each year. (34)

It remains that whatever figure you choose to believe about the side effects from drugs, all the experts agree that you have to multiply that by 20 to get a more accurate estimate of what is really occurring in the burgeoning “field” of iatrogenic medicine.

A 2003 survey is all the more distressing because there seems to be no improvement in error reporting even with all the attention on this topic. Dr. Dorothea Wild surveyed medical residents at a community hospital in Connecticut. She found that only half of the residents were aware that the hospital had a medical error-reporting system, and the vast majority didn’t use it at all. Dr. Wild says this does not bode well for the future. If doctors don’t learn error reporting in their training, they will never use it. And she adds that error reporting is the first step in finding out where the gaps in the medical system are and fixing them. That first baby step has not even begun. (35)

Public Suggestions on Iatrogenesis
In a telephone survey, 1,207 adults were asked to indicate how effective they thought the following would be in reducing preventable medical errors that resulted in serious harm: (36)

* Giving doctors more time to spend with patients: very effective 78 percent
* Requiring hospitals to develop systems to avoid medical errors: very effective 74 percent
* Better training of health professionals: very effective 73 percent
* Using only doctors specially trained in intensive care medicine on intensive care units: very effective 73 percent
* Requiring hospitals to report all serious medical errors to a state agency: very effective 71 percent
* Increasing the number of hospital nurses: very effective 69 percent
* Reducing the work hours of doctors-in-training to avoid fatigue: very effective 66 percent
* Encouraging hospitals to voluntarily report serious medical errors to a state agency: very effective 62 percent

http://www.ourcivilisation.com/medicine/usamed.htm

Tabacco: Have you ever heard before of the American Iatrogenic Association (AIA)? Neither had I.

The American Iatrogenic Association is devoted to the study and reporting of medical errors that lead to disease and death.

In 2000, a presidential task force labeled medical errors a “national problem of epidemic proportions.” Members estimated that the “cost associated with these errors in lost income, disability, and health care costs is as much as $29 billion annually.” That same year the Institute of Medicine released an historic report, “To err is human: building a safer health system.” The report’s authors concluded that 44,000 to 98,000 people die each year as a result of errors during hospitalization. They noted that “even when using the lower estimate, deaths due to medical errors exceed the number attributable to the 8th-leading cause of death”. The addition of non-hospital errors may drive the numbers of errors and deaths much higher. As the authors note, the hospital data “offer only a very modest estimate of the magnitude of the problem since hospital patients represent only a small proportion of the total population at risk, and direct hospital costs are only a fraction of total costs.”

Medical errors are the not only way that consumers are harmed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million people annually acquire infections while hospitalized and 90,000 people die from those infections. More than 70 percent of hospital-acquired infections have become resistant to at least one of the drugs commonly used to treat them, largely due to the overprescribing of antibiotics by physicians. Staph, the leading cause of hospital infections, is now resistant to 95 percent of first-choice antibiotics and 30 percent of second-choice antibiotics. Poor staff hygiene is considered the leading source for infections acquired during hospitalizations. But efforts to get medical workers to improve safety through things as simple as better and more frequent hand washing have met with little success.

There is much disagreement as to what constitutes iatrogenic illness.

For decades, peptic ulcers were said to be

caused by an emotional disorder, which

prevented afflicted people from managing

“stress.” Physicians instructed many

people with ulcers to change their

lifestyles and, in some cases, to take

anti-anxiety medications. In recent years

researchers determined that most

peptic ulcers were caused by a bacteria,

treatable with antibiotics.

 

Were the adverse emotional and treatment consequences of misdiagnosing ulcers as a psychiatric illness iatrogenic? Similarly, for many years epilepsy was said by medical experts to be evidence of pathological criminality. Epileptics were imprisoned in “colonies,” to isolate them from the general population. Were the obviously damaging effects of this “treatment” iatrogenic?

Are the present large-scale drugging of

children (mostly boys), diagnosed with

“Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder”,

and the former “treatment” of

homosexuals with electroconvulsive

therapy (shock treatment),

insulin coma, and lobotomy examples of

iatrogenic disease?

 

Most physicians would say they are not, yet the harm resulting from these erroneous diagnoses and severe “treatments” are no less damaging for the people who suffered them.

AIA casts a bright light on this debate, opening up medicine’s murky side to public scrutiny and offering help to its victims. Our new web site will accomplish this in various and evolving ways, including:

* the publishing of articles, essays, studies, book excerpts
* making recommendations that will protect you from iatrogenic illness
* publishing data on the risks of various medical procedures
* investigating ways that an iatrogenically harmed person might be made well and, when appropriate, compensated for his or her disability and suffering
* legal referrals
* offering proposals for political and social changes that reduce iatrogenic risk and hold perpetrators accountable
* an opportunity for iatrogenic victims to share their experiences with our readers

The site invites the participation of medical, legal, and political specialists, but it is designed for the general public and to be as free of obfuscatory medical jargon as possible.

If you agree with the objectives of the AIA you can help by making a donation.

Please note that donations to the American Iatrogenic Association are not tax-deductible.

Nicolas S. Martin, Executive Director

This site contains some files in the Acrobat (pdf) format. The free Reader necessary to read these files can be downloaded here.

Our e-mail address: aia@iatrogenic.org

©2002, American Iatrogenic Association
www.iatrogenic.org


 

  

The enumerating of unnecessary medical events is very important in our analysis. Any medical procedure that is invasive and not necessary must be considered as part of the larger iatrogenic picture. Unfortunately, cause and effect go unmonitored. The figures on unnecessary events represent people (“patients”) who are thrust into a dangerous health care system. They are helpless victims. Each one of these 16.4 million lives is being affected in a way that could have a fatal consequence. Simply entering a hospital could result in the following (out of 16. 4 million people):

* 2.1 percent chance of a serious adverse drug reaction (186,000) (1)
* 5 percent to 6 percent chance of acquiring a nosocomial [hospital] infection (489,500) (9)
* 4 percent to 36 percent chance of having an iatrogenic injury in hospital (medical error and adverse drug reactions) (1.78 million) (16)
* 17 percent chance of a procedure error (1.3 million) (40)

All the statistics above represent a one-year time span. Imagine the numbers over a 10-year period. Working with the most conservative figures from our statistics we project the following 10-year death rates.

  

Our projected statistic of 7.8 million iatrogenic deaths is more than all the casualties from wars that America has fought in its entire history.

Our projected figures for unnecessary medical events occurring over a 10-year period are also dramatic.



These projected figures show that a total of 164 million people, approximately 56 percent of the population of the United States, have been treated unnecessarily by the medical industry—in other words, nearly 50,000 people per day.

http://www.ourcivilisation.com/medicine/usamed/deaths.htm

Now let’s take a look at another group of charts on the subject of Death:

http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html




Additional Chart added 2014 – Not 1-word about Iatrogenesis here! I have updated my original charts from 2007 just as this website did because the old charts were out-of-date.

Besides, the true purpose of using these Charts is to demonstrate the utter Absence of that unmentionable word!

-

HOW THE A.M.A. KEEPS ITS

-

         DIRTY SECRETS SECRET

-

2007 DEATHS – ALL CAUSES

In 2007 There Were 2,423,712 Total Deaths from All Causes
We List 2,072,282 Deaths from the Top 20 Causes in the Tables Below

Age Group 0-1

23,241 Deaths for Ages 0-1 = 0.96 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Congenital Anomalies 5,785 24.89% of Group
2 Short Gestation 4,857 20.9% of Group
3 SIDS 2,453 10.55% of Group
4 Maternal Pregnancy Comp. 1,769 7.61% of Group
5 Unintentional Injury 1,285 5.53% of Group
6 Placenta Cord Membranes 1,135 4.88% of Group
7 Bacterial Sepsis 820 3.53% of Group
8 Respiratory Distress 789 3.39% of Group
9 Circulatory System Disease 624 2.68% of Group
10 Neonatal Hemorrhage 597 2.57% of Group
11 Necrotizing Enterocolitis 554 2.38% of Group
12 Gastritis 413 1.78% of Group
13 Atelectasis 366 1.57% of Group
14 Intrauterine Hypoxia 356 1.53% of Group
15 Homicide 352 1.51% of Group
16 Septicemia 283 1.22% of Group
17 Chronic Respiratory Disease 243 1.05% of Group
18 Influenza & Pneumonia 222 0.96% of Group
19 Hydrops Fetalis 177 0.76% of Group
20 Pulmonary Hemorrhage 161 0.69% of Group

Age Group 1-4

3,593 Deaths for Ages 1-4 = 0.15 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Unintentional Injury 1,588 44.2% of Group
2 Congenital Anomalies 546 15.2% of Group
3 Homicide 398 11.08% of Group
4 Malignant Neoplasms 364 10.13% of Group
5 Heart Disease 173 4.81% of Group
6 Influenza & Pneumonia 109 3.03% of Group
7 Septicemia 78 2.17% of Group
8 Perinatal Period 70 1.95% of Group
9 Benign Neoplasms 59 1.64% of Group
10 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 57 1.59% of Group
11 Cerebrovascular 52 1.45% of Group
12 Nephritis 22 0.61% of Group
13 Anemias 17 0.47% of Group
14 Acute Bronchititis 16 0.45% of Group
15 Meningitis 16 0.45% of Group
16 Pneumonitis 8 0.22% of Group
17 Diabetes Mellitus 5 0.14% of Group
18 Hernia 5 0.14% of Group
19 Meningococcal Infection 5 0.14% of Group
20 Nutritional Deficiencies 5 0.14% of Group

Age Group 5-9

2,181 Deaths for Ages 5-9 = 0.09 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Unintentional Injury 965 44.25% of Group
2 Malignant Neoplasms 480 22.01% of Group
3 Congenital Anomalies 196 8.99% of Group
4 Homicide 133 6.1% of Group
5 Heart Disease 110 5.04% of Group
6 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 54 2.48% of Group
7 Influenza & Pneumonia 48 2.2% of Group
8 Benign Neoplasms 41 1.88% of Group
9 Cerebrovascular 38 1.74% of Group
10 Septicemia 36 1.65% of Group
11 Nephritis 14 0.64% of Group
12 Anemias 13 0.6% of Group
13 Diabetes Mellitus 10 0.46% of Group
14 Perinatal Period 10 0.46% of Group
15 Meningitis 9 0.41% of Group
16 Meningococcal Infection 7 0.32% of Group
17 Diseases Of Appendix 6 0.28% of Group
18 Pneumonitis 5 0.23% of Group
19 Suicide 4 0.18% of Group
20 Shigellosis 2 0.09% of Group

Age Group 10-14

2,754 Deaths for Ages 10-14 = 0.11 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Unintentional Injury 1,229 44.63% of Group
2 Malignant Neoplasms 479 17.39% of Group
3 Homicide 213 7.73% of Group
4 Suicide 180 6.54% of Group
5 Congenital Anomalies 178 6.46% of Group
6 Heart Disease 131 4.76% of Group
7 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 64 2.32% of Group
8 Influenza & Pneumonia 55 2% of Group
9 Cerebrovascular 45 1.63% of Group
10 Benign Neoplasms 43 1.56% of Group
11 Septicemia 38 1.38% of Group
12 Anemias 19 0.69% of Group
13 Meningitis 16 0.58% of Group
14 Perinatal Period 12 0.44% of Group
15 Diabetes Mellitus 11 0.4% of Group
16 Pneumonitis 11 0.4% of Group
17 Nephritis 10 0.36% of Group
18 HIV 9 0.33% of Group
19 Aortic Aneurysm 7 0.25% of Group
20 Diseases Of Appendix 4 0.15% of Group

Age Group 15-24

30,289 Deaths for Ages 15-24 = 1.25 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Unintentional Injury 15,897 52.48% of Group
2 Homicide 5,551 18.33% of Group
3 Suicide 4,140 13.67% of Group
4 Malignant Neoplasms 1,653 5.46% of Group
5 Heart Disease 1,084 3.58% of Group
6 Congenital Anomalies 402 1.33% of Group
7 Cerebrovascular 195 0.64% of Group
8 Diabetes Mellitus 168 0.55% of Group
9 Influenza & Pneumonia 163 0.54% of Group
10 Complicated Pregnancy 160 0.53% of Group
11 HIV 160 0.53% of Group
12 Septicemia 160 0.53% of Group
13 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 149 0.49% of Group
14 Anemias 90 0.3% of Group
15 Nephritis 86 0.28% of Group
16 Benign Neoplasms 81 0.27% of Group
17 Pneumonitis 47 0.16% of Group
18 Aortic Aneurysm 38 0.13% of Group
19 Meningitis 35 0.12% of Group
20 Liver Disease 30 0.1% of Group

Age Group 25-34

36,714 Deaths for Ages 25-34 = 1.51 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Unintentional Injury 14,977 40.79% of Group
2 Suicide 5,278 14.38% of Group
3 Homicide 4,758 12.96% of Group
4 Malignant Neoplasms 3,463 9.43% of Group
5 Heart Disease 3,223 8.78% of Group
6 HIV 1,091 2.97% of Group
7 Diabetes Mellitus 610 1.66% of Group
8 Cerebrovascular 505 1.38% of Group
9 Congenital Anomalies 417 1.14% of Group
10 Liver Disease 384 1.05% of Group
11 Influenza & Pneumonia 331 0.9% of Group
12 Complicated Pregnancy 326 0.89% of Group
13 Septicemia 297 0.81% of Group
14 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 263 0.72% of Group
15 Nephritis 261 0.71% of Group
16 Benign Neoplasms 138 0.38% of Group
17 Anemias 136 0.37% of Group
18 Aortic Aneurysm 99 0.27% of Group
19 Hypertension 85 0.23% of Group
20 Viral Hepatitis 72 0.2% of Group

Age Group 35-44

67,832 Deaths for Ages 35-44 = 2.8 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Unintentional Injury 16,931 24.96% of Group
2 Malignant Neoplasms 13,288 19.59% of Group
3 Heart Disease 11,839 17.45% of Group
4 Suicide 6,722 9.91% of Group
5 HIV 3,572 5.27% of Group
6 Homicide 3,052 4.5% of Group
7 Liver Disease 2,570 3.79% of Group
8 Cerebrovascular 2,133 3.14% of Group
9 Diabetes Mellitus 1,984 2.92% of Group
10 Septicemia 910 1.34% of Group
11 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 796 1.17% of Group
12 Influenza & Pneumonia 784 1.16% of Group
13 Nephritis 754 1.11% of Group
14 Congenital Anomalies 513 0.76% of Group
15 Viral Hepatitis 489 0.72% of Group
16 Hypertension 384 0.57% of Group
17 Aortic Aneurysm 364 0.54% of Group
18 Benign Neoplasms 340 0.5% of Group
19 Complicated Pregnancy 220 0.32% of Group
20 Anemias 187 0.28% of Group

Age Group 45-54

159,981 Deaths for Ages 45-54 = 6.6 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Malignant Neoplasms 50,167 31.36% of Group
2 Heart Disease 37,434 23.4% of Group
3 Unintentional Injury 20,315 12.7% of Group
4 Liver Disease 8,212 5.13% of Group
5 Suicide 7,778 4.86% of Group
6 Cerebrovascular 6,385 3.99% of Group
7 Diabetes Mellitus 5,753 3.6% of Group
8 HIV 4,156 2.6% of Group
9 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 4,153 2.6% of Group
10 Viral Hepatitis 2,815 1.76% of Group
11 Septicemia 2,431 1.52% of Group
12 Nephritis 2,233 1.4% of Group
13 Homicide 2,140 1.34% of Group
14 Influenza & Pneumonia 1,909 1.19% of Group
15 Hypertension 1,235 0.77% of Group
16 Aortic Aneurysm 752 0.47% of Group
17 Benign Neoplasms 699 0.44% of Group
18 Congenital Anomalies 685 0.43% of Group
19 Pneumonitis 436 0.27% of Group
20 Peptic Ulcer 293 0.18% of Group

Age Group 55-64

252,803 Deaths for Ages 55-64 = 10.43 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Malignant Neoplasms 103,171 40.81% of Group
2 Heart Disease 65,527 25.92% of Group
3 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 12,777 5.05% of Group
4 Unintentional Injury 12,193 4.82% of Group
5 Diabetes Mellitus 11,304 4.47% of Group
6 Cerebrovascular 10,500 4.15% of Group
7 Liver Disease 8,004 3.17% of Group
8 Suicide 5,069 2.01% of Group
9 Nephritis 4,440 1.76% of Group
10 Septicemia 4,231 1.67% of Group
11 Influenza & Pneumonia 3,152 1.25% of Group
12 Viral Hepatitis 2,413 0.95% of Group
13 Hypertension 2,124 0.84% of Group
14 HIV 1,721 0.68% of Group
15 Aortic Aneurysm 1,483 0.59% of Group
16 Benign Neoplasms 1,416 0.56% of Group
17 Homicide 980 0.39% of Group
18 Pneumonitis 884 0.35% of Group
19 Alzheimer’s Disease 728 0.29% of Group
20 Congenital Anomalies 686 0.27% of Group

Age Group 65-74

344,275 Deaths for Ages 65-74 = 14.2 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Malignant Neoplasms 138,466 40.22% of Group
2 Heart Disease 89,589 26.02% of Group
3 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 28,664 8.33% of Group
4 Cerebrovascular 18,007 5.23% of Group
5 Diabetes Mellitus 15,112 4.39% of Group
6 Unintentional Injury 8,753 2.54% of Group
7 Nephritis 7,752 2.25% of Group
8 Septicemia 6,345 1.84% of Group
9 Influenza & Pneumonia 5,547 1.61% of Group
10 Liver Disease 5,167 1.5% of Group
11 Alzheimer’s Disease 3,984 1.16% of Group
12 Hypertension 3,133 0.91% of Group
13 Aortic Aneurysm 2,616 0.76% of Group
14 Suicide 2,444 0.71% of Group
15 Benign Neoplasms 2,402 0.7% of Group
16 Parkinson’s Disease 2,310 0.67% of Group
17 Pneumonitis 1,724 0.5% of Group
18 Viral Hepatitis 871 0.25% of Group
19 Atherosclerosis 829 0.24% of Group
20 Anemias 560 0.16% of Group

Age Group 75-84

563,193 Deaths for Ages 75-84 = 23.24 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Heart Disease 171,257 30.41% of Group
2 Malignant Neoplasms 163,608 29.05% of Group
3 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 48,041 8.53% of Group
4 Cerebrovascular 41,979 7.45% of Group
5 Alzheimer’s Disease 23,009 4.09% of Group
6 Diabetes Mellitus 21,189 3.76% of Group
7 Influenza & Pneumonia 14,859 2.64% of Group
8 Nephritis 14,711 2.61% of Group
9 Unintentional Injury 13,736 2.44% of Group
10 Septicemia 10,403 1.85% of Group
11 Parkinson’s Disease 9,363 1.66% of Group
12 Hypertension 6,442 1.14% of Group
13 Pneumonitis 5,187 0.92% of Group
14 Benign Neoplasms 4,717 0.84% of Group
15 Aortic Aneurysm 4,346 0.77% of Group
16 Liver Disease 3,694 0.66% of Group
17 Atherosclerosis 2,298 0.41% of Group
18 Suicide 2,119 0.38% of Group
19 Anemias 1,224 0.22% of Group
20 Gallbladder Disorders 1,011 0.18% of Group

Age Group 85+

585,426 Deaths for Ages 85+ = 24.15 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Heart Disease 235,249 40.18% of Group
2 Malignant Neoplasms 87,656 14.97% of Group
3 Cerebrovascular 55,975 9.56% of Group
4 Alzheimer’s Disease 46,804 7.99% of Group
5 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 32,857 5.61% of Group
6 Influenza & Pneumonia 25,535 4.36% of Group
7 Nephritis 16,021 2.74% of Group
8 Unintentional Injury 15,803 2.7% of Group
9 Diabetes Mellitus 15,227 2.6% of Group
10 Hypertension 10,536 1.8% of Group
11 Septicemia 9,614 1.64% of Group
12 Pneumonitis 8,451 1.44% of Group
13 Parkinson’s Disease 7,911 1.35% of Group
14 Atherosclerosis 4,590 0.78% of Group
15 Benign Neoplasms 4,209 0.72% of Group
16 Aortic Aneurysm 3,279 0.56% of Group
17 Anemias 1,989 0.34% of Group
18 Nutritional Deficiencies 1,343 0.23% of Group
19 Gallbladder Disorders 1,284 0.22% of Group
20 Liver Disease 1,093 0.19% of Group

Age Group All Ages

2,042,750 Deaths for Ages All Ages = 84.28 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Heart Disease 616,067 30.16% of Group
2 Malignant Neoplasms 562,875 27.55% of Group
3 Cerebrovascular 135,952 6.66% of Group
4 Chronic Low. Respiratory Disease 127,924 6.26% of Group
5 Unintentional Injury 123,706 6.06% of Group
6 Alzheimer’s Disease 74,632 3.65% of Group
7 Diabetes Mellitus 71,382 3.49% of Group
8 Influenza & Pneumonia 52,717 2.58% of Group
9 Nephritis 46,448 2.27% of Group
10 Septicemia 34,828 1.7% of Group
11 Suicide 34,598 1.69% of Group
12 Liver Disease 29,165 1.43% of Group
13 Hypertension 23,965 1.17% of Group
14 Parkinson’s Disease 20,058 0.98% of Group
15 Homicide 18,361 0.9% of Group
16 Pneumonitis 16,988 0.83% of Group
17 Perinatal Period 14,599 0.71% of Group
18 Benign Neoplasms 14,204 0.7% of Group
19 Aortic Aneurysm 12,986 0.64% of Group
20 HIV 11,295 0.55% of Group

Tabacco: I am 72 and have poor vision, so I may have missed it – please recheck the Charts above to see if IATROGENESIS appears in any form whatsoever! But I digress – back to those Charts!


 

2007 DEATHS – By ACCIDENTS

In 2007 There Were 2,423,712 Total Deaths from All Causes
We List 123,672 Deaths from the Top 15 Causes in the Tables Below

Age Group 0-1

1,285 Deaths for Ages 0-1 = 0.05 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Suffocation 959 74.63% of Group
2 Motor Vehicle Traffic 122 9.49% of Group
3 Drowning 57 4.44% of Group
4 Fire/burn 39 3.04% of Group
5 Fall 24 1.87% of Group
6 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 20 1.56% of Group
7 Poisoning 19 1.48% of Group
8 Natural/ Environment 18 1.4% of Group
9 Unspecified Cause 14 1.09% of Group
10 Struck by or Against Misc. Objects 6 0.47% of Group
11 Other Transport 2 0.16% of Group
12 Pedestrian, Other 2 0.16% of Group
13 Cut/pierce 1 0.08% of Group
14 Firearm 1 0.08% of Group
15 Other Land Transport 1 0.08% of Group

Age Group 1-4

1,588 Deaths for Ages 1-4 = 0.07 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Drowning 458 28.84% of Group
2 Motor Vehicle Traffic 428 26.95% of Group
3 Fire/burn 204 12.85% of Group
4 Suffocation 149 9.38% of Group
5 Pedestrian, Other 124 7.81% of Group
6 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 44 2.77% of Group
7 Fall 36 2.27% of Group
8 Poisoning 34 2.14% of Group
9 Natural/ Environment 27 1.7% of Group
10 Firearm 18 1.13% of Group
11 Other Land Transport 16 1.01% of Group
12 Unspecified Cause 14 0.88% of Group
13 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 13 0.82% of Group
14 Other Transport 9 0.57% of Group
15 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 7 0.44% of Group
16 Machinery 4 0.25% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 2 0.13% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 1 0.06% of Group

Age Group 5-9

965 Deaths for Ages 5-9 = 0.04 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 456 47.25% of Group
2 Fire/burn 136 14.09% of Group
3 Drowning 122 12.64% of Group
4 Suffocation 42 4.35% of Group
5 Other Land Transport 40 4.15% of Group
6 Pedestrian, Other 32 3.32% of Group
7 Firearm 20 2.07% of Group
8 Struck by or Against Misc. Objects 20 2.07% of Group
9 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 17 1.76% of Group
10 Unspecified Cause 16 1.66% of Group
11 Natural/ Environment 12 1.24% of Group
12 Poisoning 12 1.24% of Group
13 Fall 11 1.14% of Group
14 Other Transport 11 1.14% of Group
15 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 7 0.73% of Group
16 Machinery 5 0.52% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 5 0.52% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 1 0.1% of Group

Age Group 10-14

1,229 Deaths for Ages 10-14 = 0.05 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 696 56.63% of Group
2 Drowning 102 8.3% of Group
3 Other Land Transport 80 6.51% of Group
4 Fire/burn 78 6.35% of Group
5 Poisoning 69 5.61% of Group
6 Suffocation 60 4.88% of Group
7 Firearm 26 2.12% of Group
8 Fall 21 1.71% of Group
9 Pedestrian, Other 17 1.38% of Group
10 Other Transport 16 1.3% of Group
11 Natural/ Environment 15 1.22% of Group
12 Pedal cyclist, Other 12 0.98% of Group
13 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 10 0.81% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 10 0.81% of Group
15 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 8 0.65% of Group
16 Unspecified Cause 5 0.41% of Group
17 Machinery 3 0.24% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 1 0.08% of Group

Age Group 15-24

15,897 Deaths for Ages 15-24 = 0.66 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 10,272 64.62% of Group
2 Poisoning 3,159 19.87% of Group
3 Drowning 630 3.96% of Group
4 Other Land Transport 310 1.95% of Group
5 Fall 233 1.47% of Group
6 Fire/burn 196 1.23% of Group
7 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 156 0.98% of Group
8 Firearm 155 0.98% of Group
9 Pedestrian, Other 139 0.87% of Group
10 Other Transport 135 0.85% of Group
11 Suffocation 133 0.84% of Group
12 Natural/ Environment 92 0.58% of Group
13 Unspecified Cause 92 0.58% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 64 0.4% of Group
15 Machinery 62 0.39% of Group
16 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 37 0.23% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 21 0.13% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 11 0.07% of Group

Age Group 25-34

14,977 Deaths for Ages 25-34 = 0.62 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 6,842 45.68% of Group
2 Poisoning 5,700 38.06% of Group
3 Drowning 381 2.54% of Group
4 Fall 334 2.23% of Group
5 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 244 1.63% of Group
6 Other Land Transport 233 1.56% of Group
7 Fire/burn 225 1.5% of Group
8 Suffocation 193 1.29% of Group
9 Other Transport 138 0.92% of Group
10 Pedestrian, Other 120 0.8% of Group
11 Unspecified Cause 118 0.79% of Group
12 Firearm 94 0.63% of Group
13 Natural/ Environment 89 0.59% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 87 0.58% of Group
15 Machinery 81 0.54% of Group
16 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 62 0.41% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 26 0.17% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 8 0.05% of Group
19 Overexertion 2 0.01% of Group

Age Group 35-44

16,931 Deaths for Ages 35-44 = 0.7 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Poisoning 7,575 44.74% of Group
2 Motor Vehicle Traffic 6,135 36.24% of Group
3 Fall 593 3.5% of Group
4 Drowning 417 2.46% of Group
5 Fire/burn 313 1.85% of Group
6 Suffocation 289 1.71% of Group
7 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 251 1.48% of Group
8 Other Land Transport 227 1.34% of Group
9 Unspecified Cause 195 1.15% of Group
10 Other Transport 162 0.96% of Group
11 Pedestrian, Other 157 0.93% of Group
12 Natural/ Environment 148 0.87% of Group
13 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 135 0.8% of Group
14 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 109 0.64% of Group
15 Firearm 91 0.54% of Group
16 Machinery 87 0.51% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 32 0.19% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 14 0.08% of Group
19 Overexertion 1 0.01% of Group

Age Group 45-54

20,315 Deaths for Ages 45-54 = 0.84 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Poisoning 9,006 44.33% of Group
2 Motor Vehicle Traffic 6,262 30.82% of Group
3 Fall 1,304 6.42% of Group
4 Fire/burn 496 2.44% of Group
5 Drowning 481 2.37% of Group
6 Suffocation 479 2.36% of Group
7 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 370 1.82% of Group
8 Unspecified Cause 318 1.57% of Group
9 Natural/ Environment 282 1.39% of Group
10 Other Land Transport 256 1.26% of Group
11 Other Transport 212 1.04% of Group
12 Pedestrian, Other 191 0.94% of Group
13 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 188 0.93% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 175 0.86% of Group
15 Machinery 139 0.68% of Group
16 Firearm 82 0.4% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 56 0.28% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 17 0.08% of Group
19 Overexertion 1 0% of Group

Age Group 55-64

12,193 Deaths for Ages 55-64 = 0.5 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 4,177 34.26% of Group
2 Poisoning 3,120 25.59% of Group
3 Fall 1,739 14.26% of Group
4 Fire/burn 505 4.14% of Group
5 Suffocation 484 3.97% of Group
6 Unspecified Cause 392 3.21% of Group
7 Drowning 324 2.66% of Group
8 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 229 1.88% of Group
9 Natural/ Environment 220 1.8% of Group
10 Other Transport 209 1.71% of Group
11 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 178 1.46% of Group
12 Other Land Transport 150 1.23% of Group
13 Pedestrian, Other 127 1.04% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 123 1.01% of Group
15 Machinery 118 0.97% of Group
16 Firearm 57 0.47% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 28 0.23% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 13 0.11% of Group

Age Group 65-74

8,753 Deaths for Ages 65-74 = 0.36 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 2,773 31.68% of Group
2 Fall 2,594 29.64% of Group
3 Suffocation 609 6.96% of Group
4 Poisoning 602 6.88% of Group
5 Unspecified Cause 557 6.36% of Group
6 Fire/burn 430 4.91% of Group
7 Drowning 194 2.22% of Group
8 Natural/ Environment 166 1.9% of Group
9 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 150 1.71% of Group
10 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 129 1.47% of Group
11 Other Land Transport 127 1.45% of Group
12 Other Transport 97 1.11% of Group
13 Pedestrian, Other 85 0.97% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 83 0.95% of Group
15 Machinery 74 0.85% of Group
16 Pedal cyclist, Other 36 0.41% of Group
17 Firearm 31 0.35% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 15 0.17% of Group
19 Overexertion 1 0.01% of Group

Age Group 75-84

13,736 Deaths for Ages 75-84 = 0.57 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Fall 6,552 47.7% of Group
2 Motor Vehicle Traffic 2,670 19.44% of Group
3 Unspecified Cause 1,436 10.45% of Group
4 Suffocation 1,173 8.54% of Group
5 Fire/burn 461 3.36% of Group
6 Poisoning 355 2.58% of Group
7 Natural/ Environment 198 1.44% of Group
8 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 186 1.35% of Group
9 Drowning 184 1.34% of Group
10 Other Land Transport 122 0.89% of Group
11 Pedestrian, Other 98 0.71% of Group
12 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 65 0.47% of Group
13 Machinery 63 0.46% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 58 0.42% of Group
15 Other Transport 42 0.31% of Group
16 Firearm 31 0.23% of Group
17 Cut/pierce 24 0.17% of Group
18 Pedal cyclist, Other 16 0.12% of Group
19 Overexertion 2 0.01% of Group

Age Group 85+

15,803 Deaths for Ages 85+ = 0.65 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Fall 9,188 58.14% of Group
2 Unspecified Cause 2,862 18.11% of Group
3 Suffocation 1,427 9.03% of Group
4 Motor Vehicle Traffic 1,189 7.52% of Group
5 Fire/burn 288 1.82% of Group
6 Poisoning 192 1.21% of Group
7 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 179 1.13% of Group
8 Natural/ Environment 175 1.11% of Group
9 Drowning 88 0.56% of Group
10 Other Land Transport 55 0.35% of Group
11 Pedestrian, Other 45 0.28% of Group
12 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 40 0.25% of Group
13 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 27 0.17% of Group
14 Machinery 23 0.15% of Group
15 Firearm 7 0.04% of Group
16 Pedal cyclist, Other 6 0.04% of Group
17 Cut/pierce 5 0.03% of Group
18 Other Transport 5 0.03% of Group
19 Overexertion 2 0.01% of Group

Age Group All Ages

123,706 Deaths for Ages All Ages = 5.1 % of All Deaths
Cause of Death Deaths
1 Motor Vehicle Traffic 42,031 33.98% of Group
2 Poisoning 29,846 24.13% of Group
3 Fall 22,631 18.29% of Group
4 Unspecified Cause 6,019 4.87% of Group
5 Suffocation 5,997 4.85% of Group
6 Drowning 3,443 2.78% of Group
7 Fire/burn 3,375 2.73% of Group
8 Other Land Transport 1,617 1.31% of Group
9 Other Specified Cause, Classifiable 1,542 1.25% of Group
10 Natural/ Environment 1,449 1.17% of Group
11 Pedestrian, Other 1,138 0.92% of Group
12 Other Specified Cause, Not Elsewhere Classifiabl 1,113 0.9% of Group
13 Other Transport 1,039 0.84% of Group
14 Struck by or Against Misc. Object(s) 832 0.67% of Group
15 Machinery 659 0.53% of Group
16 Firearm 613 0.5% of Group
17 Pedal cyclist, Other 242 0.2% of Group
18 Cut/pierce 111 0.09% of Group
19 Overexertion 9 0.01% of Group

What?! Still no mention of IATROGENESIS!

Let’s try FOUL PLAY!

 

 

2007 DEATHS – BY VIOLENCE

In 2007 There Were 2,423,712 Total Deaths from All Causes
We List 53,196 Deaths from the Top 10 Causes in the Tables Below

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 0-1

352 Deaths for Ages 0-1 = 0.01 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Homicide Unspecified

174

49.43% of Group

2 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

86

24.43% of Group

3 Homicide Suffocation

30

8.52% of Group

4 Homicide Firearm

15

4.26% of Group

5 Homicide (Other)

15

4.26% of Group

6 Homicide Drowning

11

3.13% of Group

7 Homicide Poisoning

11

3.13% of Group

8 Homicide Fire/burn

5

1.42% of Group

9 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

4

1.14% of Group

10 Homicide Cut/pierce

1

0.28% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 1-4

398 Deaths for Ages 1-4 = 0.02 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Homicide Unspecified

174

43.72% of Group

2 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

61

15.33% of Group

3 Homicide Firearm

48

12.06% of Group

4 Homicide (Other)

33

8.29% of Group

5 Homicide Suffocation

32

8.04% of Group

6 Homicide Fire/burn

15

3.77% of Group

7 Homicide Poisoning

13

3.27% of Group

8 Homicide Drowning

10

2.51% of Group

9 Homicide Cut/pierce

8

2.01% of Group

10 Homicide – Struck by or Against Object

4

1.01% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 5-9

137 Deaths for Ages 5-9 = 0.01 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Homicide Firearm

47

34.31% of Group

2 Homicide Suffocation

21

15.33% of Group

3 Homicide Cut/pierce

13

9.49% of Group

4 Homicide Unspecified

13

9.49% of Group

5 Homicide Fire/burn

12

8.76% of Group

6 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

11

8.03% of Group

7 Homicide (Other)

7

5.11% of Group

8 Homicide Poisoning

7

5.11% of Group

9 Suicide Suffocation

3

2.19% of Group

10 Homicide Drowning

2

1.46% of Group

11 Suicide Poisoning

1

0.73% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 10-14

394 Deaths for Ages 10-14 = 0.02 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Homicide Firearm

154

39.09% of Group

2 Suicide Suffocation

119

30.2% of Group

3 Suicide Firearm

53

13.45% of Group

4 Homicide Cut/pierce

22

5.58% of Group

5 Homicide Unspecified

12

3.05% of Group

6 Homicide Fire/burn

8

2.03% of Group

7 Homicide (Other)

7

1.78% of Group

8 Suicide Poisoning

6

1.52% of Group

9 Homicide Suffocation

5

1.27% of Group

10 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

2

0.51% of Group

11 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

2

0.51% of Group

12 Homicide Poisoning

1

0.25% of Group

13 Legal Intervention Firearm

1

0.25% of Group

14 Suicide (Other)

1

0.25% of Group

15 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

1

0.25% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 15-24

9,772 Deaths for Ages 15-24 = 0.4 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Homicide Firearm

4,669

47.78% of Group

2 Suicide Firearm

1,900

19.44% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

1,533

15.69% of Group

4 Homicide Cut/pierce

444

4.54% of Group

5 Suicide Poisoning

362

3.7% of Group

6 Homicide Unspecified

201

2.06% of Group

7 Homicide Suffocation

108

1.11% of Group

8 Suicide Fall

103

1.05% of Group

9 Legal Intervention Firearm

96

0.98% of Group

10 Homicide (Other)

69

0.71% of Group

11 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

68

0.7% of Group

12 Suicide Drowning

47

0.48% of Group

13 Suicide Cut/pierce

35

0.36% of Group

14 Suicide Transportation Related

33

0.34% of Group

15 Suicide (Other)

31

0.32% of Group

16 Homicide – Struck by or Against an Object

18

0.18% of Group

17 Homicide Fire/burn

15

0.15% of Group

18 Suicide Fire/burn

15

0.15% of Group

19 Suicide Unspecified

13

0.13% of Group

20 Homicide Poisoning

12

0.12% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 25-34

10,126 Deaths for Ages 25-34 = 0.42 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Homicide Firearm

3,751

37.04% of Group

2 Suicide Firearm

2,306

22.77% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

1,770

17.48% of Group

4 Suicide Poisoning

802

7.92% of Group

5 Homicide Cut/pierce

466

4.6% of Group

6 Homicide Unspecified

259

2.56% of Group

7 Suicide Fall

125

1.23% of Group

8 Homicide Suffocation

112

1.11% of Group

9 Legal Intervention Firearm

107

1.06% of Group

10 Homicide (Other)

96

0.95% of Group

11 Suicide Drowning

64

0.63% of Group

12 Suicide Cut/pierce

62

0.61% of Group

13 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

53

0.52% of Group

14 Suicide (Other)

30

0.3% of Group

15 Suicide Unspecified

26

0.26% of Group

16 Homicide Fire/burn

22

0.22% of Group

17 Suicide Transportation Related

22

0.22% of Group

18 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

21

0.21% of Group

19 Suicide Fire/burn

18

0.18% of Group

20 Legal Intervention Other Spec., classifiable

14

0.14% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 35-44

9,843 Deaths for Ages 35-44 = 0.41 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

2,879

29.25% of Group

2 Homicide Firearm

2,038

20.71% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

1,839

18.68% of Group

4 Suicide Poisoning

1,419

14.42% of Group

5 Homicide Cut/pierce

409

4.16% of Group

6 Homicide Unspecified

304

3.09% of Group

7 Suicide Fall

165

1.68% of Group

8 Suicide Cut/pierce

118

1.2% of Group

9 Homicide Suffocation

114

1.16% of Group

10 Homicide (Other)

110

1.12% of Group

11 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

82

0.83% of Group

12 Legal Intervention Firearm

76

0.77% of Group

13 Suicide Drowning

75

0.76% of Group

14 Suicide (Other)

45

0.46% of Group

15 Suicide Unspecified

39

0.4% of Group

16 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

38

0.39% of Group

17 Suicide Transportation Related

31

0.31% of Group

18 Suicide Fire/burn

30

0.3% of Group

19 Homicide Fire/burn

19

0.19% of Group

20 Legal Intervention Other Spec., classifiable

13

0.13% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 45-54

9,943 Deaths for Ages 45-54 = 0.41 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

3,531

35.51% of Group

2 Suicide Poisoning

2,015

20.27% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

1,589

15.98% of Group

4 Homicide Firearm

1,159

11.66% of Group

5 Homicide Cut/pierce

347

3.49% of Group

6 Homicide Unspecified

297

2.99% of Group

7 Suicide Cut/pierce

190

1.91% of Group

8 Suicide Fall

152

1.53% of Group

9 Homicide (Other)

122

1.23% of Group

10 Homicide Suffocation

108

1.09% of Group

11 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

75

0.75% of Group

12 Suicide Drowning

69

0.69% of Group

13 Suicide (Other)

61

0.61% of Group

14 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

53

0.53% of Group

15 Legal Intervention Firearm

49

0.49% of Group

16 Suicide Fire/burn

38

0.38% of Group

17 Suicide Unspecified

35

0.35% of Group

18 Suicide Transportation Related

22

0.22% of Group

19 Homicide Fire/burn

20

0.2% of Group

20 Homicide Poisoning

11

0.11% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 55-64

6,050 Deaths for Ages 55-64 = 0.25 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

2,786

46.05% of Group

2 Suicide Poisoning

1,147

18.96% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

725

11.98% of Group

4 Homicide Firearm

446

7.37% of Group

5 Homicide Unspecified

208

3.44% of Group

6 Homicide Cut/pierce

149

2.46% of Group

7 Suicide Cut/pierce

125

2.07% of Group

8 Suicide Fall

93

1.54% of Group

9 Homicide (Other)

73

1.21% of Group

10 Homicide Suffocation

53

0.88% of Group

11 Suicide Drowning

45

0.74% of Group

12 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

37

0.61% of Group

13 Suicide (Other)

36

0.6% of Group

14 Suicide Unspecified

32

0.53% of Group

15 Suicide Fire/burn

27

0.45% of Group

16 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

22

0.36% of Group

17 Suicide Transportation Related

16

0.26% of Group

18 Legal Intervention Firearm

14

0.23% of Group

19 Homicide Fire/burn

12

0.2% of Group

20 Homicide Fall

4

0.07% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 65-74

2,857 Deaths for Ages 65-74 = 0.12 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

1,700

59.5% of Group

2 Suicide Poisoning

320

11.2% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

275

9.63% of Group

4 Homicide Firearm

185

6.48% of Group

5 Homicide Unspecified

95

3.33% of Group

6 Homicide Cut/pierce

66

2.31% of Group

7 Suicide Fall

37

1.3% of Group

8 Suicide Cut/pierce

35

1.23% of Group

9 Homicide (Other)

24

0.84% of Group

10 Homicide Suffocation

23

0.81% of Group

11 Suicide Drowning

23

0.81% of Group

12 Suicide (Other)

20

0.7% of Group

13 Suicide Fire/burn

11

0.39% of Group

14 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

10

0.35% of Group

15 Homicide Fire/burn

8

0.28% of Group

16 Suicide Unspecified

8

0.28% of Group

17 Legal Intervention Firearm

5

0.18% of Group

18 Suicide Transportation Related

5

0.18% of Group

19 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

4

0.14% of Group

20 Homicide Poisoning

3

0.11% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 75-84

2,385 Deaths for Ages 75-84 = 0.1 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

1,589

66.62% of Group

2 Suicide Suffocation

205

8.6% of Group

3 Suicide Poisoning

198

8.3% of Group

4 Homicide Firearm

88

3.69% of Group

5 Homicide Unspecified

74

3.1% of Group

6 Homicide Cut/pierce

46

1.93% of Group

7 Suicide Cut/pierce

35

1.47% of Group

8 Suicide Fall

33

1.38% of Group

9 Homicide (Other)

26

1.09% of Group

10 Suicide Drowning

23

0.96% of Group

11 Homicide Suffocation

21

0.88% of Group

12 Suicide Fire/burn

12

0.5% of Group

13 Suicide (Other)

9

0.38% of Group

14 Suicide Unspecified

8

0.34% of Group

15 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

5

0.21% of Group

16 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

4

0.17% of Group

17 Homicide Fire/burn

3

0.13% of Group

18 Homicide Fall

2

0.08% of Group

19 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

2

0.08% of Group

20 Homicide Poisoning

2

0.08% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group 85+

939 Deaths for Ages 85+ = 0.04 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

606

64.54% of Group

2 Suicide Suffocation

103

10.97% of Group

3 Suicide Poisoning

86

9.16% of Group

4 Homicide Unspecified

28

2.98% of Group

5 Homicide Firearm

23

2.45% of Group

6 Suicide Fall

23

2.45% of Group

7 Suicide Cut/pierce

19

2.02% of Group

8 Suicide Drowning

11

1.17% of Group

9 Homicide Suffocation

7

0.75% of Group

10 Homicide Cut/pierce

5

0.53% of Group

11 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

5

0.53% of Group

12 Suicide Fire/burn

5

0.53% of Group

13 Homicide (Other)

4

0.43% of Group

14 Homicide Poisoning

4

0.43% of Group

15 Suicide (Other)

3

0.32% of Group

16 Homicide Fire/burn

2

0.21% of Group

17 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

2

0.21% of Group

18 Suicide Unspecified

2

0.21% of Group

19 Legal Intervention Firearm

1

0.11% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

Age Group All Ages

53,130 Deaths for Ages All Ages = 2.19 % of All Deaths

Cause of Death

Deaths

1 Suicide Firearm

17,352

32.66% of Group

2 Homicide Firearm

12,632

23.78% of Group

3 Suicide Suffocation

8,161

15.36% of Group

4 Suicide Poisoning

6,358

11.97% of Group

5 Homicide Cut/pierce

1,981

3.73% of Group

6 Homicide Unspecified

1,846

3.47% of Group

7 Suicide Fall

731

1.38% of Group

8 Homicide Suffocation

637

1.2% of Group

9 Suicide Cut/pierce

619

1.17% of Group

10 Homicide (Other)

586

1.1% of Group

11 Suicide Drowning

358

0.67% of Group

12 Legal Intervention Firearm

351

0.66% of Group

13 Suicide Other Spec., classifiable

331

0.62% of Group

14 Suicide (Other)

236

0.44% of Group

15 Homicide Other Spec., classifiable

186

0.35% of Group

16 Homicide Struck by or Against an Object

173

0.33% of Group

17 Suicide Unspecified

163

0.31% of Group

18 Suicide Fire/burn

157

0.3% of Group

19 Homicide Fire/burn

141

0.27% of Group

20 Suicide Transportation Related

131

0.25% of Group

Ages: 0-1 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ All Ages

 

Tabacco: Did you notice anything unusual? Did you notice any relevant category omitted from the last 3 charts groupings? Why do you think that is?

 

Maybe that’s why most of my Readers, most of America has not heard the terms “iatrogenic”, “Iatrogenesis” or “AIA – American Iatrogenic Association. Anyone can look up the terms. I have provided my sources. Why can’t the MSM (Mainstream Media) look them up and report on it? Answer: Because the AMA, like the Israel lobby, is so strong that MSM dare not report negatively on their acts. And if someone does report on Iatrogenic FAQs, who has a much larger audience than Tabacco, the same fate will befall him, as is Jimmy Carter’s lot for writing a tome, exposing the Israeli deceits and hypocrisies – Marginalization & Virulent Ad Hominem Attacks!

The “Powers That Be” have several Primary Deceptions, which they exploit because of the ignorance and Myopia of the general population:

 

Secrecy
Disinformation
Marginalization
Ad Hominem Attacks
Denial
Repetition of Talking Points
Threat of & Use of Boycott
Complete & Utter Silence & Disregard, 
Ignoring the Issue

 

One of the Byproducts of “Democratic Capitalism” is Political Correctness in which

Originally Published January 13, 2007 (4,041H) 

Republished March 9, 2008/ Reissued May 4, 2011 (7,155H +1C) 

TOTALS: 11,196H + 1C to date

 

-

Jamaal Colson, Jr., died of Iatrogenic Malpractice at Beth Israel Medical Center after circumcision. When his picture becomes available, I will add this to the Post itself. – Tabacco

 http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/brooklyn-toddler-dies-circumcision/story?id=13544632

 

 


Tabacco: I guarantee you the word “iatrogenic” or “iatrogenesis” will NOT APPEAR on Jamaal Coleson, Jr.’s DEATH CERTIFICATE!

 

THE TRUTH THAT DARE
 
NOT SPEAK

ITS NAME!

 


This Post ranks number 134 All-Time at Blog-City with 4,223 Reads.

 

 

Tabacco: I consider myself both a funnel and a filter. I funnel information, not readily available on the Mass Media, which is ignored and/or suppressed. I filter out the irrelevancies and trivialities to save both the time and effort of my Readers and bring consternation to the enemies of Truth & Fairness! When you read Tabacco, if you don’t learn something NEW, I’ve wasted your time.

 

 

In 1981′s ‘Body Heat’, Kathleen Turner said, “Knowledge is power”.


T.A.B.A.C.C.O.  (Truth About Business And Congressional Crimes Organization)

-

 

To Read Comments On This Post, Go To:

http://tabacco.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org/?p=2564

 

To Go To The Tabacco Main Page

Listing All Posts, Go To:

www.tabacco.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org

 

To Read Posts On My Wyandanch Blog, Go To

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www.wyandanch.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org

Subdomain re Exploited Minority Long Island community

 

To Go To NEW CULINARY BLOG:

http://culinary.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org

 

 


 

COMMENTER’S BIBLE

 

Anyone may Comment here, but if you want your Comment published, you must obey the TABACCO RULES as stipulated in:

 

TABACCO’S RULES OF ENGAGEMENT! Most Comments Here Don’t Get Published. This Post Is Not Aimed At Those Charlatans; It is Intended To Edify My Veto Stance To The Intellectually Honest Readers Among You.

http://tabacco.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org/?p=180

 

Because of Spam, Capitalists attempting to gain Free Advertising on my Blogs and other irrelevancies, Tabacco no longer reads Comments on Posts.

 

Relevant Post or Post URL must appear as e-mail SUBJECT!

 

To register a Comment, e-mail Tabacco at:

contact@tabacco.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org

 

 

 


B-C0741

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4 Responses to IATROGENESIS! The Truth That Dare Not Speak Its Name! Iatrogenic Deaths: America’s Dark Secret – The Leading Cause of Death In USA, Not Auto, Heart Or Cancer, But The AMA Won’t Permit It To Be Mentioned On Autopsies! – RI10

  1. admin says:

    Apparently the AMERICAN IATROGENIC ASSOCIATION is now defunct? But the NRA is alive and still kicking? So much for Fairness under Capitalism! If you don’t have VESTED INTERESTS behind you with DEEP POCKETS, EXTINCTION is ultimately your fate!

    You may be reading on this Blog what’s left of anti-Iatrogenesis in America!

    I just found this website while searching for the AIA:

    Doctors Are The Third Leading Cause of Death

    in the US, Causing 250,000 Deaths Every Year

    According to a report from the Institute of Medicine, at least 1.5 million patients are harmed every year from being given the wrong drugs — that’s an average of one person per U.S. hospital per day. One reason these mistakes persist: Only 10% of hospitals are fully computerized, with a central database to track allergies and diagnoses, accodring Robert Wachter, chief of the medical service at UC San Francisco Medical Center. This well-known problem is not new news.

    In 2000, a presidential task force labeled medical errors a “national problem of epidemic proportions.” The task force estimated that the “cost associated with these errors in lost income, disability, and health care costs is as much as $29 billion annually.”

    Journal of the American Medical Association Volume 284 July 26, 2000

    Dr. Barbara Starfield of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health describes how the world’s most expensive health care system contributes to poor health and even death.

    DEATHS PER YEAR:

    · 12,000 – unnecessary surgery 8

    · 7,000 – medication errors in hospitals 9

    · 20,000 – other errors in hospitals 10

    · 80,000 – infections in hospitals 10

    · 106,000 – negative effects of drugs 2

    250,000 deaths per year from iatrogenic causes

    What does “iatrogenic” mean? “Induced in a patient by a physician’s activity, manner, or therapy – especially a complication of treatment.”

    Dr. Starfield offers several warnings in interpreting these numbers:

    · First, most of the data are derived from studies in hospitalized patients.

    · Second, these estimates are for deaths only and do not include negative effects associated with disability or discomfort.

    · Third, the estimates of death due to error are lower than those in the older IOM report.1

    If the higher estimates are used, the deaths due to iatrogenic causes would be 284,000. In any case, 225,000 deaths per year constitutes the third leading cause of death in the United States, after deaths from heart disease and cancer. Even if these figures are overestimated, there is a wide margin between these numbers of deaths and the next leading cause of death (cerebrovascular disease).

    Another analysis 11 concluded that between 4% and 18% of consecutive patients experience negative effects in outpatient settings, with:

    · 116 million extra physician visits

    · 77 million extra prescriptions

    · 17 million emergency department visits

    · 8 million hospitalizations

    · 3 million long-term admissions
    http://joyfulaging.com/iatrogenic.htm

    Go to that URL to read entire post including links at bottom to:
    See also Pill Pushing Quacks

    See also Medical Minefield – Avoiding Common Errors

    Return to Joyful Aging home page

    Republished by Tabacco

  2. admin says:

    HIV Or IATROGENESIS?

    Note how cavalierly they list ‘HIV’! The Truth is few patients actually die from HIV. From the early days, most HIV+ people died from overmedication with AZT, not from the HIV itself. The doctors prescribed AZT doses in LETHAL QUANTITIES – that qualifies as Cause of Death: IATROGENESIS!

    Those folks died from the MEDICAL TREATMENT, NOT THE ILLNESS!

    It’s about time the AMA took credit for its contribution to AZT DEATHS in America!

    Just one more instance of ‘Too Big To Fails’ lying to the American Public to save their own reputations and Profit$!

    Tabacco

  3. admin says:

    HOSPICES! You can add Hospices to AZT and all the other forms of Medical Treatment Deaths in Iatrogenic America. Yes, these patients are going to die. We are all going to die! But when the Tea Party was railing over ObamaCare ‘killing grandma’, could they not see Hospices!

    If you murder patients before their time by removing all medications except Morphine, how do you rate being superior to Dr. Kevorkian? At least Kevorkian’s patients went voluntarily and expecting to die immediately. Patients go into hospices sometimes believing they will be going home after a brief stay. THAT’S MURDER IN 1ST DEGREE! Hippocratic Oath my foot!

    Tabacco

  4. admin says:

    Cause of JOAN RIVERS’ DEATH: Can you say “Iatrogenesis”! (Shhhhhh!)

    “I would like to talk about the 3rd leading cause of Death in the United states, Iatrogenic Disease, also known as ‘medical malpractice’ and the state of our Healthcare system, taking the USA as a -bad- example.

    Here some extracts from articles about it:

    Medical Mistakes Often UnreportedDetroit News

    Based on a recent report by the Institute of Medicine, which estimates 36 error-related hospital deaths per 100,000 people, 3,534 Michiganians died last year due to medical mistakes.

    Patients reported 2,027 complaints about health care organizations to the state, but Tom Lindsay, director of the Michigan Bureau of Health Services, said those likely represent just a fraction of the mistakes.

    Medical MistakesNew York Times

    The NEW YORK TIMES reported that 5% of people admitted to hospitals, or about 1.8 million people per year, in the U.S. pick up an infection while there. Such infections are called “iatrogenic” — meaning “induced by a physician,” or, more loosely, “caused by medical care.”

    Iatrogenic infections are directly responsible for 20,000 deaths among hospital patients in the U.S. each year, and they contribute to an additional 70,000 deaths, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control CDC). The dollar cost of iatrogenic infections is $4.5 billion, according to the CDC.

    National Patient Safety Foundation

    A new poll from the nonprofit National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) finds that 42 percent of people say they’ve been affected by physician errors, either directly or through a friend or relative.

    If the survey of roughly 1,500 people accurately represents the general public, it could mean that more than 100 million Americans have experience with medical mistakes.

    More alarming, according to the survey, is the fact that in one out of three cases the error permanently harmed the patient’s health.

    Dr. Leape is a board member of the NPSF, which was founded by the American Medical Association in June of this year to improve health care safety.

    AMA leaders say it’s time to bring the issue out into the open, rather than living in constant fear that any admission of error will launch a flood of malpractice lawsuits.

    Leape’s own research has shown that the tally of medical mistakes made each year could reach 3 million, with total costs as high as $200 billion.

    The survey found that 40 percent of the people who had experienced a medical mistake pointed to misdiagnoses and wrong treatments as the problem. Medication errors accounted for 28 percent of mistakes.

    And 22 percent of respondents reported slip-ups during medical procedures.

    Half of the errors occurred in hospitals, and 22 percent in doctors’ offices.

    “It’s really a joke to worry about the occasional plane that goes down when we have thousands of people who are killed in hospitals every year.” Brook’s recognition of the extent of hospital errors is shared by many of medicine’s leaders.

    Care — not treatment — is the answer. Drugs, surgery and hospitals become increasingly dangerous for chronic disease cases. Facilitating the God-given healing capacity by improving the diet, exercise, and lifestyle is the key.

    Effective interventions for the underlying emotional and spiritual wounding behind most chronic disease is critical for the reinvention of our medical paradigm. These numbers suggest that reinvention of our medical paradigm is called for.” – https://eleonoragozzini.wordpress.com/tag/iatrogenesis/

    Republished by Tabacco
    PS Thank you to this Serious Blogger!

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