EDUCATION SEGREGATION! “What Happens When We Provide The Same Education To Others That Is Typically Afforded To The Children Of The Lucky, The Entitled & The Rich?” NYS State Prison Inmate Debate Team (Representing Bard Prison Initiative) DEFEATS Harvard University Debate Team! TOPIC: ‘Whether U.S. Public Schools Should Be Able To Deny Enrollment To Undocumented Students’. Prison Debaters Required To Argue Affirmative Position! RESOLVED: The Disenfranchised Prison Population Can Benefit From Higher Education Behind Bars As Much As The Silver Spoon Set! ANALYSIS: Why High Cost Of College Education Is Permitted To Escalate Astronomically – It Is Not Unpreventable Or Accidental – THINK: Which Group Of Americans Can Afford $60,000 Per Annum For Their Offspring’s College Tuition! America’s Elitists Want The Best Education For Their Offspring & ONLY Their Offspring! If Your Degree Is NOT From Elite University, You Are Marginalized & Will Never Rise At A Fortune 500! And If You Cannot Afford $60K Per Annum, Your Employment Ceiling Is Set! HIGHER EDUCATION INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX Vis-à-vis PUBLIC EDUCATION INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX (CHARTER/ PRIVATIZED SCHOOLS)

 

NO SILVER SPOONS IN THIS GROUP!

 

               


http://www.democracynow.org/2015/10/30/prison_to_college_pipeline_program_at

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Image Credit: Jared Ames

 

Despite their stellar record, a loss by the Harvard University debate team wouldn’t normally be national, let alone international, news. But one match last month wasn’t your typical sparring contest. Three members of the Harvard team squared off with opponents not from a rival university, but a maximum security New York prison. The topic was whether U.S. public schools should be able to deny enrollment to undocumented students. Despite being forced to advocate a position they don’t agree with, the prison team was declared the winner. The story went viral across the United States and around the world. The prisoners were debating as representatives of the Bard Prison Initiative, a program that offers inmates a college-level liberal arts education. Since its founding in 2001, more than 300 alumni have earned degrees while behind bars. We are joined by Max Kenner, founder and executive director of the Bard Prison Initiative.


TRANSCRIPT

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

 

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Despite their stellar record, a loss by the Harvard University debate team wouldn’t normally be national, let alone international, news. But one match last month wasn’t your typical sparring contest. Three members of the Harvard team squared off with opponents, not from a rival university, but from a maximum security New York state prison. The topic was whether U.S. public schools should be able to deny enrollment to undocumented students. And despite being forced to advocate a position they don’t agree with, the prison team was declared the winner. The story went viral across the U.S. and around the world.

 

AMY GOODMAN: The prisoners were debating as representatives of the Bard Prison Initiative, a program that offers inmates a college-level liberal arts education. Since its founding in 2001, more than 300 alumni have earned degrees while behind bars.

 

For more, we’re joined by Max Kenner, the founder and executive director of the Bard Prison Initiative, 2014 recipient of the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award in Education.

 

It’s great to have you with us. Describe the scene. Where did this debate take place? How did it take place?

 

MAX KENNER: Well, the scene, you know, it was really very simple. It happens in an auditorium, within a maximum-security prison. While the people debating on our side are incarcerated, Juan, they are, as Amy said, college students. We are a college team, and we are a college. And, you know, we run, in this particular maximum-security prison and others across the state, the closest thing we can to a full liberal arts curriculum, at replicating a full college experience. So students study the full breadth of humanities, science, math, Mandarin language, German language, Spanish language, etc., and also engage in some extracurricular activities—

 

AMY GOODMAN: Did the Harvard students come to the prison?

 

MAX KENNER: —the debate being one of them! So, people are interested in rhetoric, in public speaking and debate, and that got to the point where we started doing regular intercollegiate debates once a semester. We start with West Point. We debate the cadets from the West Point Academy every spring. And we did well, and it was exciting and fun.

 

AMY GOODMAN: Who won?

 

MAX KENNER: So we invited Harvard to come, which was the national champion last year. And so far our record is three and one with the debates.

 

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And the inmates, your team, argued against providing assistance to undocumented students?

 

MAX KENNER: That’s right. Sure. It’s a little more technical than that, but that’s boring, yeah.

 

AMY GOODMAN: Now, but did the Harvard students come to the prison?

 

MAX KENNER: That’s right. Everything happens in person. Nothing happens remotely.

 

AMY GOODMAN: So, they—

 

MAX KENNER: In our program, in the classroom and otherwise!

 

AMY GOODMAN: So they come to a maximum-security prison.

 

MAX KENNER: Yeah!

 

AMY GOODMAN: And they debate this?

 

MAX KENNER: Sure! So it’s a large auditorium, same place where we have graduations and what have you. In the audience were over a hundred other incarcerated Bard students and a scattering of faculty and other friends of the program. And then there’s a stage. And then there were three Harvard kids on one side, three of the incarcerated Bard students on the other, and a panel of judges.

 

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Who were the judges?

 

MAX KENNER: Judges are people who do this professionally, work in that profession.

 

AMY GOODMAN: And how did the prisoners feel?

 

MAX KENNER: Look, anytime you get on a stage and are forced to, you know, articulate something clearly and be judged how well you are and clearly you are articulating it as compared to someone else, that’s causing anxiety. And, you know, I think it’s amazing how much the media has responded to the fact that Harvard might lose. You know, we’ve been doing this for a while, and just how special it was didn’t quite dawn on us until two weeks later after the event. This was still the most popular story in The Wall Street Journal. It sort of amazed us.

 

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: What was the reaction of the Harvard team and the Harvard coach?

 

MAX KENNER: You know, to their credit, I don’t think they thought it was extraordinary, either, you know? I think they maybe, you know, wish they had prepared a little more. I don’t know. You know!

 

AMY GOODMAN: How are the prisoners selected? How is the debate team—

 

MAX KENNER: So, it’s a self-selecting group in that you can join the Debate Union as a Bard student, if you choose, for fun, so something you do, you know, once or twice a week. And then they prepare. And these are people, you know, all joking aside, who are very busy. They’re enrolled full-time in college in an extremely rigorous academic program. And so, while there are 15 or so members of the Debate Union, they sort of self-select the three or four, who participate formally in a given competition.

 

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Did the warden offer them any reduction of their sentences as a result of the victory?

 

MAX KENNER: I don’t think that’s at his discretion, but I think many people felt surprising satisfaction at seeing—

 

AMY GOODMAN: And were the audience prisoners?

 

MAX KENNER: Yeah, our other incarcerated Bard students, that’s right!

 

AMY GOODMAN: I want to turn to a clip from a film that the Bard Prison Initiative produced on the occasion of its 10th anniversary. This is Erica Mateo, who graduated from the program in 2011.

 

ERICA MATEO: Growing up in Brownsville, I always felt like I would end up in prison, because I didn’t feel like I had many options. I’m now working as a case manager, working with 16- to 24-year-olds who have some criminal justice system involvement within the last 12 months. People don’t expect a lot from these kids. And if people actually got to know them, they would prove almost everything wrong. You know, they aren’t lazy kids. They want to work. They’re eager to work. They have dreams, like they want to be accountants and architects. And it brings me a lot of pleasure to see them achieve their goals.

 

AMY GOODMAN: So that’s Erica Mateo, who graduated from the Bard Prison Initiative in 2011. How are the students taught in—who are prisoners? Do the Bard professors come to prison?

 

MAX KENNER: Absolutely! Everything happens in person. And the work is less extraordinary and less novel, I think, than it might seem. Everything we do, the entire—the basic idea of the program is an experiment, is: What happens when we provide the same education, that is typically afforded to the children of the lucky and the entitled and the rich, to others? And the results have been extraordinary. We have, you know, alumni in graduate schools at Yale, Columbia, NYU, people working in management in billion-dollar businesses—and most of all, alumni like Erica, going back to the communities from which they came, serving youth at risk, people with HIV and AIDS, the homeless, etc.

 

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: In the less than a minute that we have left, has this program of Bard’s been replicated in other states at all?

 

MAX KENNER: Absolutely! There’s suddenly a real resurgence in a belief in the place of education in American prisons. And we have a program called the Consortium for the Liberal Arts in Prison, where we work with sister college universities—Washington University in St. Louis, University of Notre Dame, etc. We’re in 11 states across the country.

 

AMY GOODMAN: We’ve heard a lot about the school-to-prison pipeline. You’re talking here about the prison-to-college pipeline. What can be done to help students? Earlier this year, President Obama announced a plan to offer limited Pell grants to federal and state prisoners. What would that mean?

 

MAX KENNER: Well, that will transform the meaning of our prison system back to what it was prior to the Clinton crime bill in 1994, which is to say, though we incarcerate you as a fellow citizen or you as a neighbor, we have not written off the possibility of your contributions to society permanently.

 

AMY GOODMAN: Max, as we wrap up, how did you end up doing this? We only have 15 seconds.

 

MAX KENNER: Oh, dear! Well, I was an undergraduate at Bard College and recognized what’s now common, that the investment we made in punishment over a generation was extraordinary, and that educators have a place in fixing these social problems, and they shouldn’t wait for the government and the public sector to lead the way.

 

AMY GOODMAN: Max Kenner, founder and executive director of the Bard Prison Initiative. He conceived and created the Bard Prison Initiative as a student volunteer organization when he was an undergraduate at Bard.

 

That does it for our program today. We have a job opening, director of development. You can go to our website, democracynow.org, to get the details and send in your résumé.

 


http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/obama-announces-plans-prisoners-jobs-article-1.2421161


President Obama unveiled a pair of moves to help former prisoners get jobs more easily while in Newark on Monday, while touting the city’s work at helping those who’ve served their time get back on their feet.

 

“We’ve got to make sure Americans who’ve paid their debt to society can earn their second chance,” Obama said at Rutgers University.

 

“The federal government, I believe, should not use criminal history to screen out applicants before we’ve even looked at their qualifications,” he said, announcing that he’s directing the federal government to “ban the box” on job applications asking about a criminal record for most competitive jobs at federal agencies, and planning to spend more money for pilot programs to help ex-cons return to society and avoid getting entangled in the problems that landed them in jail in the first place.

 

Obama lauded Newark’s efforts to help former felons get jobs and stay on the straight and narrow during remarks at Rutgers, and made the comments after touring the nearby Integrity House halfway home in Newark.

(If you can, begin viewing ‘Due Process’, which Tabacco gets on New Jersey’s NJN, Channel 50)

“Here in Newark when it comes to rehabilitating prisoners… you’ve got organizations that are doing extraordinary work,” he said, singling out Integrity House.

 

The visit is the latest public effort by Obama to try to bring attention — and reform — to the criminal justice system. During his speech he pointed out that almost 70 million Americans have a criminal record of some sort, and that “a lot of time that record disqualifies you from being a full participant in our society even if you’ve fully paid your debt to society.”

 

Obama singled out three locals who are making good on turning their lives around — including Dquan Rosario, a former drug dealer who got a job in medical transportation, studied to be an emergency medical technician, and now works as an EMT in Essex County, N.J.


“Instead of peddling drugs that are destroying lives he’s saving lives, he’s making the community better,” Obama said after asking Rosario as well as his parole officer and other government officials who’ve helped him to stand up, to big cheers.

 

Some of the Integrity House residents were thrilled about the President’s visit.

 

Chris Eckhardt, 47, a former Integrity resident and now employee of the rehab program, said Obama’s visit “shows that he cares” about the community.

-

“It’s a good sign. It’s inspirational for a lot of people”, he said.

 

And Andrea Sweatt, 47, another house employee, said the residents, “were very uplifted by the President’s visit”.

 

Before his remarks, Obama participated in a closed-press roundtable at the Rutgers-Newark School of Criminal Justice on continuing education for formerly incarcerated people.

 

The event included ex-cons, a probation officer, a local judge, a local pastor who is a recovering addict and is involved in the community, and a local business owner who works with halfway houses to hire former convicts.

 

Obama went from the streets to the swanky after the event, heading into the city for a pair of big-dollar fundraisers for the Democratic National Committee and Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Monday night.

 

 

ANALYSIS: WHY DID IT

TAKE SO LONG?

Tabacco: When you release Prisoners from Prison after serving their Time and then you restrict their Employment Opportunities by Asking about/Rejecting them for Prior Incarceration, you are in effect:

1 – Compounding their Punishment beyond Judicial Sentencing

2 – Pushing Prisoners back into Illegal Activities & Recidivism

3 – Creating a Sub-Citizen Group, which has no respect for Law & Order, no respect for other people and no respect for America

4 – Proscribing a Class of Americans, who are unable to support themselves by legal employment, thereby forcing them into the same Criminal Activities for which they have already been Punished by removing all Hope.

You might just as well not educate Prisoners in the 1st place! What were we thinking!


Tabacco: I consider myself both a funnel and a filter. I funnel information, not readily available on the Mass Media, which is ignored and/or suppressed. I filter out the irrelevancies and trivialities to save both the time and effort of my Readers and bring consternation to the enemies of Truth & Fairness! When you read Tabacco, if you don’t learn something NEW, I’ve wasted your time.

 

 

If Tabacco is talking about a subject that nobody else is discussing, it means that subject is more, not less important, and the Powers-That-Be are deliberately avoiding that Issue. To presume otherwise completely defeats my purpose in blogging.

 

 

Tabacco is not a blogger, who thinks; I am a Thinker, who blogs. Speaking Truth to Power!

 

In 1981′s ‘Body Heat’, Kathleen Turner said, “Knowledge is power”.


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One Response to EDUCATION SEGREGATION! “What Happens When We Provide The Same Education To Others That Is Typically Afforded To The Children Of The Lucky, The Entitled & The Rich?” NYS State Prison Inmate Debate Team (Representing Bard Prison Initiative) DEFEATS Harvard University Debate Team! TOPIC: ‘Whether U.S. Public Schools Should Be Able To Deny Enrollment To Undocumented Students’. Prison Debaters Required To Argue Affirmative Position! RESOLVED: The Disenfranchised Prison Population Can Benefit From Higher Education Behind Bars As Much As The Silver Spoon Set! ANALYSIS: Why High Cost Of College Education Is Permitted To Escalate Astronomically – It Is Not Unpreventable Or Accidental – THINK: Which Group Of Americans Can Afford $60,000 Per Annum For Their Offspring’s College Tuition! America’s Elitists Want The Best Education For Their Offspring & ONLY Their Offspring! If Your Degree Is NOT From Elite University, You Are Marginalized & Will Never Rise At A Fortune 500! And If You Cannot Afford $60K Per Annum, Your Employment Ceiling Is Set! HIGHER EDUCATION INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX Vis-à-vis PUBLIC EDUCATION INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX (CHARTER/ PRIVATIZED SCHOOLS)

  1. admin says:

    Report: Firm Recorded Thousands of Attorney-Prisoner Phone Calls

    In what appears to be a massive breach in attorney-client privilege in the United States, The Intercept has obtained a trove of prisoner phone records, including recorded calls between prisoners and their attorneys. Attorney-client phone calls are privileged communications which are not supposed to be recorded. But hacked phone records from Securus Technologies—a leading provider of phone services in prisons and jails—appear to include about 14,000 recorded attorney-prisoner conversations. The company’s contract specifically stipulates telephone calls with attorneys are not to be recorded, and any calls that are recorded must be destroyed. The ACLU said the revelations may constitute “the most massive breach of the attorney-client privilege in modern U.S. history”.
    http://www.democracynow.org/2015/11/12/headlines#111211

    Republished by Tabacco

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