Michigan Voters Face YES & NO MIXED BAG OF INITIATIVES At Polls In November: (A) One Initiative seeks to enshrine collective bargaining rights in the state constitution to stave off future attacks on unions = VIABLE SOLUTION + (B) TROJAN HORSE: controversial state law that allows the governor to appoint an unelected emergency manager or corporation to take over financially distressed towns and cities and effectively fire elected officials = PRIVATIZATION OF CITIES/END OF “DEMOCRACY”. What If The Governor Is Republican: A Very Dangerous Precedent! All Republicans Have To Do Is Change Terminology, And Nobody Recognizes PRIVATIZATION & Reversing The Will Of The Electorate! Republicans Are Not So Smart; Democrats Are Just Gullible! Tails, They Win; Heads, We Lose! Mostly, I’m Ashamed To Be A Democrat!

 

21ST CENTURY

 

TROJAN HORSE

 

CAMOUFLAGED BY

 

SENSIBLE PARTNER-

 

LEGISLATION

 

                                     

Democratic – Republican COMPROMISE”

 

TABACCO: Wake up, Michigan Voters! There’s a TROJAN HORSE ON THE BALLOT! Don’t vote Yes on both or you will be SORRY! Throwing in some good with the bad or some bad with the good is an old POLITICAL SOPHIST’S TRICK, which often masquerades under the title of COMPROMISE!

 

Maybe there is one, but I cannot think of a single Political Compromise that was ever any good! The last thing any citizen or well-meaning Democratic Legislator should ever do is COMPROMISE WITH THE DEVIL! When you mix white paint with black paint, you get gray paint. If gray is your goal, be my guest!

 

“Democrats and Republicans must COMPROMISE to get anything done”, you say? Well, Republicans rarely compromise! Democrats usually do all the compromising. If your Democratic Representative does NOT STAND FAST when he represents your interests, next time VOTE GREEN PARTY! Democrats respond positively to SCARE TACTICS – Republicans do NOT! “Why not?”, you ask? Because Republicans can always become Lobbyists if they are not reelected!

 

Compromise is supposed to produce Legislation, which is objectionable to everybody. But when Democrats compromise with Republicans, ‘We The People’ end up with frowns on our faces – only Republican Politicians and their brainless flunkies end up smiling.

 

NO LEGISLATION IS INFINITELY BETTER THAN BAD LEGISLATION!

 


http://www.democracynow.org/2011/6/23/michigan_residents_file_lawsuit_challenging_emergency

 

Thursday, June 23, 2011 Full Show

Michigan Residents File Lawsuit Challenging Emergency Law Installing Unelected City Managers

 

A group of Michigan residents have filed a suit challenging a controversial new state law that allows the governor to appoint an unelected emergency manager or corporation to take over financially distressed towns and cities and effectively fire elected officials. The law empowers these unelected managers to sell off public property, shred union contracts, and privatize government services, without any input from local voters. Michigan now has unelected emergency managers running the schools in Detroit, as well as the cities of Pontiac, Ecorse and Benton Harbor. We speak to longtime Detroit resident, Edith Lee-Payne, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, and John Philo, legal director of the Maurice & Jane Sugar Law Center for Economic and Social Justice, which filed the lawsuit against the state of Michigan. [includes rush transcript]

 

Filed under  Detroit, Financial Meltdown, John Philo, Edith Lee-Payne

 

Guests:

John Philo, legal director of the Maurice & Jane Sugar Law Center for Economic and Social Justice.

 

Edith Lee-Payne, longtime Detroit resident who is suing the state of Michigan over its emergency manager law.

 

Related

 

Links

 
Rush Transcript

This transcript is available free of charge. However, donations help us provide closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing on our TV broadcast. Thank you for your generous contribution. Donate >

 

Transcript

 

JUANGONZALEZ: A group of Michigan residents sued the state Wednesday to challenge a controversial new law that allows the governor of Michigan to appoint an unelected emergency manager or corporation to take over financially distressed towns and cities and effectively fire elected officials. The law empowers those unelected managers to sell off public property, shred union contacts, and privatize government services, without any input from local voters.

 

Some supporters have described the measure as a form of “financial martial law” needed to help restore financial stability to fiscally challenged cities and school districts. But the plaintiffs in the lawsuit question the constitutionality of a measure that gives the state the power to strip the right of residents to elect mayors, city councils and school boards.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Michigan now has an unelected emergency manager running the schools in Detroit, as well as the cities of Pontiac, Ecorse and Benton Harbor.

 

For more, we’re joined by two guests in Detroit. Edith Lee-Payne is one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, longtime Detroit resident, grandmother of two students in the Detroit school system now being run by an emergency manager. We’re also joined by John Philo, legal director of the Maurice and Jane Sugar Law Center for Economic and Social Justice. The Sugar Law Center filed the lawsuit against the state of Michigan.

 

Let’s first go to John Philo. Lay out this lawsuit you have just filed.

 

JOHNPHILO: Well, what the lawsuit’s about is we’re putting in front of the court to make the decision of whether or not local citizens have a right to a democratic form of local government, whether local citizens have a right to elect their local officials, because as it stands under this law, the governor and the state legislature is saying we do not. They’re saying that we can have a new form of government in which they appoint your local government, which is one person, and that that person is not accountable to local electors, to local citizens. There’s no right of petition. They have no voice. It takes away entirely their role in what we consider a democratic system. People assume they have a right to a democratic form of government in this country, at all levels—at the federal level, at the state level, at the local level. This is the first experiment that we know of where we’re bypassing that entirely.

 

JUANGONZALEZ: And John Philo, there have been some occasions here on the East Coast where a particular school board was taken over by the state government. It’s almost always been in cities or towns that are overwhelmingly black and Hispanic. I’m curious. This much more unprecedented effort here in Michigan, how many of these towns are largely minority towns that they’ve moved in to take over from the—to remove the right of the voters to elect their own officials?

 

JOHNPHILO: Each of them. And we believe it’s intimately related to the law, in that this is—this is disenfranchising and saying that these folks just don’t have enough responsibility to run their own local affairs. It’s directed at the low-income communities and communities of color. Those are the ones that are going to be hardest hit. Those are the ones that are hardest hit. The presence of the law itself, too, is impacting the local governments in other communities, also, again, low-income communities of color. And it’s forcing them into considering whether they should enter into a consent agreement before they have an emergency manager appointed. We don’t think—I mean, we think it’s part and parcel.

 

And, you know, I did some rough numbers, and it came out to something like 66 percent of the state, of the communities that are predominately black or African American, are in severe financial distress. Sixty-six percent of our population in this state could lose their right to vote in local elections and to have local government.

 

I think it’s important to know that this law, it’s not about the finances that we’re contesting. We had an emergency financial manager law previously. What had changed is now it’s an emergency manager law, and it expands the scope of that emergency manager not only over financial matters—this isn’t about them balancing the bucks—but it allows them to appoint and replace, you know, building commissioner members, historical commission members, human rights commission members. These are matters of policy. Those are people that come from—that traditionally in our country, anyway, you know, are expressed through local elected officials and through the voters, who have a right to pass referendum, to recall an elected official, but also to put them into office to carry out those policies. It carries over into whether or not a strip club will be located in a community or how close it would be to a church. I can’t fathom how that relates to a financial issue in the local community.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Edith—

 

JOHNPHILO: There’s nobody that would dispute—we have—I’m sorry. Go ahead.

 

AMYGOODMAN: I just wanted to bring Edith Lee-Payne into this.

 

EDITHLEE-PAYNE: Yes.

 

AMYGOODMAN: You are a longtime Detroit resident. You marched with Dr. King in Detroit in 1963, on the March on Washington in August of ’63. How did you become a plaintiff in this lawsuit?

 

EDITHLEE-PAYNE: Well, I’d been, obviously, very concerned about this emergency manager or financial manager for some time. I’m active within my community in a number of ways. And one of our council members, JoAnn Watson, had put together some community events where these issues were raised, and I wanted to become a part of it. And so, for that reason, I did.

 

AMYGOODMAN: You have compared what’s going on in Detroit to what happened to New Orleans after Katrina. Explain!

 

EDITHLEE-PAYNE: Well, actually, I did not make that kind of comparison, but what I did make a comparison to was, in 1999, the state did a takeover of our schools months after we had had an election. The school board had little time to do anything before this takeover occurred. For six years, the state-appointed representative and an appointed reform board actually put our school system in a greater deficit and greater problems. After the residents did—voted for a referendum, we were able to get our voting rights back. And that occurred in 2005. We’ve been trying to improve the conditions that happened that the state caused. Now they want to come back and do it again. So that’s actually the comparison that I’m making, where I see that this emergency manager and financial manager, and the one that we had—the recent one, Robert Bobb—did the same thing. He just put our finances, our whole school structure, in complete chaos. And now he’s gone. And there’s no recourse in this legislation. We can’t go after him to do anything, and we didn’t ask for him in the first place.

 

JUANGONZALEZ: And when you talk to fellow—

 

EDITHLEE-PAYNE: I see that—

 

JUANGONZALEZ: I’m sorry. When you talk to fellow community leaders—and the idea that this is spreading now across the entire state, in these direct takeovers, and it’s obviously fueled by a Republican-controlled legislature, your—what are they telling you? What’s their reaction to this, as it’s been characterized, martial law being perpetrated in your state?

 

EDITHLEE-PAYNE: Well, the fact that—when I’ve spoken with community leaders, as well as our legislators from Detroit, they speak as—and say that they’re powerless because of the Republican-controlled House and Senate. There is very little left for us to do but to exercise our constitutional right to vote and/or recall. That’s the only redress we have. We’re angered by it. We’re frustrated by it. And when we know that there is already laws and legislation, that constitutions are in place for us, to protect us, that give us the rights to the legislative process, and the fact that we have the branches of government that are now—the separation of powers that are also being compromised, we have—and my personal position is, when we have these things that are there for us—these are the laws that were made for us by our Founding Fathers—why would they be challenged? Why would they be compromised, especially when these legislators and our governor took an oath, this year, to uphold the very thing that they’re violating? That’s disturbing.

 

AMYGOODMAN: One early critic of the Michigan emergency manager law was the journalist Naomi Klein, author of the book The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism_. I bills”>interviewed her in March as the Michigan legislature was preparing to vote on the law.

 

NAOMIKLEIN: So it starts with the school boards, and then it’s whole towns, whole cities, that could be subject to just being dissolved because there’s an economic crisis breaking collective bargaining agreements. It also specifies that—this bill specifies that an emergency manager can be an individual or a firm. Or a firm! So, the person who would be put in charge of this so-called failing town or municipality could actually be a corporation.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Whose government they dissolve, a company takes over.

 

NAOMIKLEIN: A company takes over. So, they have created, if this passes, the possibility for privatization of a whole town by fiat. And this is actually a trend in the contracting out of public services, where you do now have whole towns, like Sandy Springs in Georgia, run by private companies. It’s very lucrative. Why not? You start with just the water contract or the electricity contract, but eventually, why not privatize the whole town? So—

 

AMYGOODMAN: And what happens then? Where does democracy fit into that picture?

 

NAOMIKLEIN: Well, this is an assault on democracy. It’s a frontal assault on democracy. It’s a kind of a corporate coup d’état at the municipal level.

 

AMYGOODMAN: That was Naomi Klein. John Philo, head of Sugar Law Center, legal director there, so what’s going to happen now with this lawsuit, not only involving Detroit, but in these cities throughout Michigan?

 

JOHNPHILO: I’m sorry, could you say that again? I had a little problem.

 

AMYGOODMAN: What is going to happen now, John—John Philo, what is going to happen now around Michigan with your lawsuit this week?

 

JOHNPHILO: Well, we’re receiving, you know, support across the state. One thing I echo with Edith is that, I mean, we could have had a thousand plaintiffs, or we could have had more than tens of thousands, I really truly believe, and we took a cross-section. Right now there’s a petition drive going on across the state that’s gaining a lot of momentum. But I saw in the paper, anyway, that the state Senate Democrats have voiced support for the lawsuit. I think that this lawsuit—I mean, this law has to either be repealed or it has to be changed. There’s a tremendous amount of concern throughout every community in this state. And it’s not just—the concern is not localized to just the communities that have an emergency manager now, and it’s not just urban areas! We’re getting support from the UP and from the northern Michigan, which is, you know, an area that traditionally is not—it’s just not known for progressive politics, but there’s good and decent people up there who know their constitutional rights.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Well, we want to thank you both for being with us, John Philo, legal director of the Sugar Law Center for Economic and Social Justice in Detroit, and Edith Lee-Payne, longtime Detroit resident, civil rights activist, one of the lead plaintiffs suing the state of Michigan over its emergency manager law.

 

 

 

http://www.democracynow.org/2012/9/18/michigan_a_key_battleground_for_labor


Tuesday, September 18, 2012 Full Show

Michigan a Key Battleground for Labor Rights with Votes on Emergency Managers, Collective Bargaining

 

Michigan voters will be asked in November to decide the future of a controversial state law that allows the governor to appoint an unelected emergency manager or corporation to take over financially distressed towns and cities and effectively fire elected officials. The law, which is now on hold, empowers unelected managers or corporations to take over cities and effectively fire elected officials. In addition, another initiative on the Michigan ballot in November aims to enshrine collective bargaining rights in the state constitution to stave off future attacks on unions. We’re joined by Paul Abowd, an investigative reporter at the Center for Public Integrity. [includes rush transcript]

 

Filed under  Election 2012, Paul Abowd

 

Guest:

 

Paul Abowd, investigative reporter at the Center for Public Integrity.

 

Related

 

Links

 

Editor’s Picks

 

Rush Transcript

 

This transcript is available free of charge. However, donations help us provide closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing on our TV broadcast. Thank you for your generous contribution. Donate >

 

Transcript

 

AMYGOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, from the PBS station WGVU.

 

Voters here in Michigan will be asked in November to decide the future of a controversial state law that allows the governor to appoint an unelected emergency manager or corporation to take over financially distressed towns and cities and effectively fire elected officials. The law, which is now on hold, empowers unelected managers to sell off public property, shred union contracts, privatize government services, without any input from local voters. Critics have described it as Michigan’s “local dictators” law.

 

In addition, another initiative on the Michigan ballot in November aims to enshrine collective bargaining rights in the state constitution to stave off future attacks on unions. Analysts say Michigan could be pivotal in the national fight over the future of the worker rights, and labor-backed groups are spending millions on ads like this one, in which an autoworker discusses the importance of collective bargaining.

 

STACIESTEWARD: This plant was on the death list. Now we’ve added a shift, and we’re expanding. Our industry is coming back, and we are fighting for our future. We’re making vehicles better than ever, bringing jobs back to America from Mexico. We have paid the government ahead of schedule. We have all pulled together in tough times. Collective bargaining is what got us here, management and workers negotiating. It’s not just about my job; it’s about this plant, this whole community. Protect collective bargaining; vote yes.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Well, for more on the Michigan ballot initiatives, we’re joined in Washington, D.C., by Paul Abowd, investigative reporter at the Center for Public Integrity. He has been following this story closely. Earlier this year, he wrote a piece called “Michigan’s Budget Crisis Puts Democracy on the Chopping Block.” He is originally from here in Michigan, from Detroit, where he reported for Labor Notes magazine and co-produced a documentary about public housing in the city, which premiered April 2012.

 

Welcome, Paul, to Democracy Now! Talk about these laws, these votes that will be taking place in November.

 

PAULABOWD: Good morning, Amy.

 

Well, these are two pretty monumental votes coming before Michigan residents in November. They both come after really drawn-out legal battles to even place them on the ballot. Both are really—the first one is an effort to repeal the emergency manager law, as you mentioned, and has had strong union support and mobilization, but also mobilization and support from a vast coalition of Michigan residents.

 

The second one is a more offensive—it’s a representation of the union movement going on the offense, I should say. Some people think it’s offensive, including folks in the Chamber of Commerce who are opposing it. But it’s a response to sort of the regional attack, since 2010, on the labor movement and on their fundamental right to collective bargaining, which we’ve seen in Wisconsin with the whole Walker recall and budget bill debacle; a similar bill which was repealed after strong union mobilization in Ohio; and the appearance for the first time in the industrial or post-industrial, depending on how you see it, Midwest of a right-to-work bill in Indiana; and then in Michigan, with the most expansive sort of attack, in many ways, on not just collective bargaining, but on voting rights and democratic rights on the local level through this emergency manager law.

 

And so, we’re seeing a response, a coordinated response, from state unions as well as national unions to get these—first to fight the legal battle to get these initiatives on the ballot, and now we’re seeing a pretty sustained air war to convince voters that they’re good for the state.

 

AMYGOODMAN: I want to talk about this bill that could replace an elected mayor, for example, with a corporation. Explain exactly how it came about, who’s behind it, and how it is being carried out, how it is being put into effect throughout Michigan.

 

PAULABOWD: Sure. Yeah, I mean, this is the product of a lot of different forces in the state, including a free market think tank called the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, which has pushed laws like the emergency manager law for several years. The original emergency manager law goes back decades in the state to 1990, to give you a sense of the scope of the economic crisis in the state. It’s decades-long, and politicians have been trying to position themselves as reformers and rescuers of the economic situation in the state for decades. So it’s not a new—this is not a new idea in the state, although when the Republicans took over the legislature in 2010 and the Governor Snyder took over the governor’s mansion the same year, we saw an intensified push, which included the passage of Public Act 4, which was an intensified version of an earlier law, which basically gave the governor, as you said in the intro, the power to elect one person as sort of financial czar to dismiss elected officials and, importantly, to shred collective bargaining agreements on the city level.

 

But the origins of the law and those pushing for it are sort of connected to a nationwide network of right-wing free market think tanks, including the Mackinac Center. Five years before the law was passed, the Mackinac Center released an editorial calling for four improvements to the original emergency law, including the power to shred collective bargaining agreements. All four of those recommendations were put into the law in 2011 that passed shortly after Snyder took office. There are connections to nationwide groups like ALEC. The Mackinac Center is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council, which is sort of a clearinghouse for corporate lawmaking, where corporate representatives and lobbyists meet with state legislators and craft laws that then get replicated throughout the country. Representatives—legislators and representatives from Mackinac Center have gone to ALEC meetings and, in many cases, have exported pieces of anti-union legislation into ALEC, where they will now become model legislation and replicate throughout different statehouses across the country.

 

AMYGOODMAN: And just to be clear, for our listeners and viewers who are not familiar with ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, Paul?

 

PAULABOWD: Well, it’s a—it’s a network, really, of state legislators and corporate lobbyists who meet three times a year, I believe, at hotels, and they have closed-door meetings, whereby corporate representatives, members of free market think tanks and state legislators get together and actually craft the language of a whole variety of bills, including—you know, they’re most famous this year for the Stand Your Ground laws, which popped up in Florida and all throughout the South, which were tied to the Trayvon Martin killing, and also the spate of voter ID and voter suppression laws that have spread throughout the country. Those laws came out of these meetings that ALEC, which is this sort of laboratory for corporate legislation—and there are very powerful players in Michigan, through the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, and also state legislators who have taken part in that process and who have taken some of the lessons from ALEC and put them back into the legislature, but also exported some of the, quote-unquote, “innovations” regarding public sector employees and collective bargaining, and taken them to the national stage, where they sort of have replicated into other statehouses.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Paul, I wanted to play a video produced by the Mackinac Center, which is part of this network of state-based groups, as you describe, associated with the Heritage Foundation, the influential right-wing think tank in Washington. In this clip provided to the media, Mackinac Center analyst Dan Armstrong gives his interpretation of Michigan’s “Protect Our Jobs” amendment.

 

DANARMSTRONG: Supporters say the Protect Our Jobs amendment would help working families by enshrining unions’ collective bargaining power in the state constitution. But most workers are employed in the private economy, which is covered by federal law. So, in reality, the amendment involves the 3 percent of Michigan residents who are government employees, and it would provide special powers to their unions. It would give government unions the power to bargain away laws passed by our elected representatives. It would make collective bargaining contracts—agreements settled behind closed doors—the law of the land. It would throw out cost savings legislation like requiring public employees to pay part of their own pension and healthcare benefits. In other words, the amendment would provide special protection for the few, pave the way to increase taxpayer costs, and give special powers to government unions.

 

AMYGOODMAN: That’s produced by the Mackinac Center. Paul Abowd, your response?

 

PAULABOWD: Well, it’s not surprising. It’s a classic tactic amongst the business elite anywhere in the country when it comes to unions, union initiatives to protect bargaining rights or to expand the power of their membership. The ironic thing really is that these ads run by the Mackinac Center and by the Chamber of Commerce in the state, they’re representative of this sort of very small—the 1 percent, if you will. On the anniversary of the Occupy movement, we can use that term. They’re representative of a very small segment of the state’s population. And so, they are continually leveling a charge that the union movement represents this special interest, when in fact the irony is clear: they represent a very small fraction of the community, and they represent their own sort of corporate interests.

 

The video itself is actually misleading, because the Protect Our Jobs initiative, which would make it a constitutional right—it would make collective bargaining a constitutional right in the state—applies to all workers, not just public sector unions or—yeah, not just public sector employees. It’s actually an attempt—it would be the first constitutional amendment of its type in the nation, in that it would effectively forestall right-to-work law in the state before anyone could propose it. And so, it’s sort of a forward-looking measure by the union movement to protect a fundamental right. And at the end of the day, as you’ll see from the Protect Our Jobs ads, the argument is that collective bargaining is not just serving the needs and interests of D.C. union bosses or even just the interests of union members, but that collective bargaining is a form of democratic expression that can be used to put forward a vision for how workplaces are shaped.

 

And in the case of the school system, as we’re seeing in Chicago with the teachers’ strike, collective bargaining can be used as a way to really put forward a positive vision for what a school should look like. In Detroit, because the public schools have been under emergency financial management, the manager, Roy Roberts, imposed a contract this summer, which—on teachers, because they had no bargaining power—which included not just a 10 percent wage cut for teachers, but also a drastic rise in class sizes. So, the argument that the union movement is making for this constitutional amendment is that collective bargaining affects not just the workplace, but can affect schools, can affect society at large, and can have a positive impact—

 

AMYGOODMAN: Paul—

 

PAULABOWD: —on people who are not union members.

 

AMYGOODMAN: Paul Abowd, I want to thank you very much for being with us, investigative reporter at the Center for Public Integrity. He’s from there; I’m from the East Coast. Paul is actually speaking to us from Washington, D.C., and we’re broadcasting from Grand Rapids, Michigan. We’re on a 100-city tour around the country. This is Democracy Now! When we come back, we’re staying right here in Grand Rapids with Marcy Wheeler. Stay with us.

 

 

Tabacco: I consider myself both a funnel and a filter. I funnel information, not readily available on the Mass Media, which is ignored and/or suppressed. I filter out the irrelevancies and trivialities to save both the time and effort of my Readers and bring consternation to the enemies of Truth & Fairness! When you read Tabacco, if you don’t learn something NEW, I’ve wasted your time.

 

Tabacco is not a blogger, who thinks; I am a Thinker, who blogs. Speaking Truth to Power!

 

In 1981′s ‘Body Heat’, Kathleen Turner said, “Knowledge is power”.


T.A.B.A.C.C.O.  (Truth About Business And Congressional Crimes Organization) – Think Tank For Other 95% Of World: WTP = We The People

 

 

www.wyandanch.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org

Subdomain re Exploited Minority Long Island community

 

 

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3 Responses to Michigan Voters Face YES & NO MIXED BAG OF INITIATIVES At Polls In November: (A) One Initiative seeks to enshrine collective bargaining rights in the state constitution to stave off future attacks on unions = VIABLE SOLUTION + (B) TROJAN HORSE: controversial state law that allows the governor to appoint an unelected emergency manager or corporation to take over financially distressed towns and cities and effectively fire elected officials = PRIVATIZATION OF CITIES/END OF “DEMOCRACY”. What If The Governor Is Republican: A Very Dangerous Precedent! All Republicans Have To Do Is Change Terminology, And Nobody Recognizes PRIVATIZATION & Reversing The Will Of The Electorate! Republicans Are Not So Smart; Democrats Are Just Gullible! Tails, They Win; Heads, We Lose! Mostly, I’m Ashamed To Be A Democrat!

  1. admin says:

    AMERICAN MISCONCEPTIONS! We The People Are At War And We Don’t Even Realize It!

    Every School Board in every Hamlet and every Jurisdiction has the power to Vote Tax Increases in your PROPERTY TAX! Those Increases don’t just affect households with children in Public Schools. Those Increases affect everyone with children in Public Schools or Private or no children in School at all. Those Increases affect Homeowners and Renters alike because Landlords don’t swallow Tax Increases; they pass them on to their Tenants.

    Likewise with Labor Unions! I am 70-years-old and have never belonged to a Union. But the Welfare and Health of Labor Unions affects every working man and woman in America. If Capitalists undermine and extinguish the Fire of Labor Unions, every Employee in America, Union or Non-Union will feel the Heel of his or her Employer on each Employee’s Neck.

    Wake up America!

    Attend School Board Meetings because they raise Everybody’s Property Taxes and subsequently Rents.

    And SUPPORT LABOR UNIONS because, without those Unions, even Non-Union Employees will get their Salaries or Wages CUT if not their Jobs Outsourced to a 3rd World Country!

    Unfortunately for all American Employees, Union and Non-Union, FDR died about 67 years ago. The only “New Deal” you will get today is the one you deal yourself! And if you don’t deal yourself, you may count on it – Corporatists and Republican Politicians will make sure the only deal you get is a “DIRTY DEAL”!

    Tabacco

  2. admin says:

    Wisconsin Is Close Enough!

    This Post is about Michigan, and Paul Ryan, Republican VP Nominee, is from the State of Wisconsin. But that’s close enough!

    Soup Kitchen Head Slams Paul Ryan for Staged Photo Op
    Facebook_20 Twitter_20
    Reddit_20 Email_20 Addthis_20

    The head of a soup kitchen in Ohio has accused Republican vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan and campaign staffers of ramrodding their way into the soup kitchen so that Ryan could get his picture taken washing dishes in the dining hall. According to news accounts, Ryan arrived at the soup kitchen after the food had been served, the patrons had left, and the hall had been cleaned. Photos show Ryan washing dishes that had reportedly already been cleaned. Brian Antal, president of the Mahoning County St. Vincent De Paul Society, criticized the Ryan team for using the soup kitchen for a staged photo op. Antal said: “They showed up there, and they did not have permission. They got one of the volunteers to open up the doors. The photo op they did wasn’t even accurate. He did nothing. He just came in here to get his picture taken at the dining hall.”
    http://www.democracynow.org/2012/10/16/headlines#101611

  3. admin says:

    DETROIT FILES CHAPTER 9 BANKRUPTCY!? What, You Didn’t Know! We Bailed Out The Car Makers, Chrysler & GM, Just Like We Bailed Out Those ‘Too Big To Fail’ Lenders, Who Screwed Us, Under T.A.R.P.! But When Predominantly BLACK Detroit (Over 80%) Is In Economic Trouble, Neither The White Michigan Republican Governor (RICK SNYDER) Nor The Black Democratic U.S. President (We All Know Who That Is) Can Lift A Finger Nor Can The EMERGENCY Black City Manager, Kevyn Orr, Selected By The White Republican Governor – Not The People – Find Any Other Solution Except Denying Full Pensions To Mostly Black City Employees! Oh Yeah, Former Pistons Basketball Star, David Bing, Is Detroit Mayor – And He Has Been Completely Neutered By That White Michigan Governor. Did I Mention That Detroit Is Predominantly Black!
    http://tabacco.t-a-b-a-c-c-o.org/?p=1512

    These 2 Posts are Siamese Twins – if you read one, you must read the other!

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